discourage

(redirected from discouragements)
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Related to discouragements: depressing, disheartenment

dis·cour·age

 (dĭ-skûr′ĭj, -skŭr′-)
tr.v. dis·cour·aged, dis·cour·ag·ing, dis·cour·ag·es
1. To deprive of confidence, hope, or spirit: Making so little progress after so much effort discouraged us.
2. To dissuade or deter (someone) from doing something: My adviser discouraged me from applying to big universities.
3. To try to prevent by expressing disapproval or raising objections: The agency discouraged all travel to the areas hardest hit by the disease.

[Middle English discoragen, from Old French descoragier : des-, dis- + corage, courage; see courage.]

dis·cour′age·a·ble adj.
dis·cour′ag·er n.
dis·cour′ag·ing·ly adv.
Synonyms: discourage, dishearten, dismay, dispirit
These verbs mean to make less hopeful or enthusiastic: researchers who were discouraged by the problem's magnitude; apathy that disheartened the instructor; did not let the technical difficulties dismay them; a failure that dispirited the team.
Antonym: encourage
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

discourage

(dɪsˈkʌrɪdʒ)
vb (tr)
1. to deprive of the will to persist in something
2. to inhibit; prevent: this solution discourages rust.
3. to oppose by expressing disapproval
disˈcouragement n
disˈcourager n
disˈcouragingly adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

dis•cour•age

(dɪˈskɜr ɪdʒ, -ˈskʌr-)

v. -aged, -ag•ing. v.t.
1. to deprive of courage, hope, or confidence; dispirit.
2. to dissuade (usu. fol. by from).
3. to obstruct by opposition or difficulty; hinder.
4. to express disapproval of; frown upon.
v.i.
5. to become discouraged.
[1400–50; late Middle English discoragen < Middle French descorager, Old French descoragier]
dis•cour′ag•er, n.
dis•cour′age•a•ble, adj.
dis•cour′ag•ing•ly, adv.
syn: discourage, dismay, intimidate mean to dishearten or frighten a person so as to prevent some action. To discourage is to dishearten by expressing disapproval or by suggesting that a contemplated action will probably fail: He was discouraged from going into business. To dismay is to dishearten, shock, or bewilder by sudden difficulties or danger: a prosecutor dismayed by disclosures of new evidence. To intimidate is to deter by making timid: The prospect of making a speech intimidates me.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

discourage

To discourage someone from doing something means to make them less willing to do it.

She wants to discourage him from marrying the girl.
The rain discouraged us from going out.
Collins COBUILD English Usage © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 2004, 2011, 2012

discourage


Past participle: discouraged
Gerund: discouraging

Imperative
discourage
discourage
Present
I discourage
you discourage
he/she/it discourages
we discourage
you discourage
they discourage
Preterite
I discouraged
you discouraged
he/she/it discouraged
we discouraged
you discouraged
they discouraged
Present Continuous
I am discouraging
you are discouraging
he/she/it is discouraging
we are discouraging
you are discouraging
they are discouraging
Present Perfect
I have discouraged
you have discouraged
he/she/it has discouraged
we have discouraged
you have discouraged
they have discouraged
Past Continuous
I was discouraging
you were discouraging
he/she/it was discouraging
we were discouraging
you were discouraging
they were discouraging
Past Perfect
I had discouraged
you had discouraged
he/she/it had discouraged
we had discouraged
you had discouraged
they had discouraged
Future
I will discourage
you will discourage
he/she/it will discourage
we will discourage
you will discourage
they will discourage
Future Perfect
I will have discouraged
you will have discouraged
he/she/it will have discouraged
we will have discouraged
you will have discouraged
they will have discouraged
Future Continuous
I will be discouraging
you will be discouraging
he/she/it will be discouraging
we will be discouraging
you will be discouraging
they will be discouraging
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been discouraging
you have been discouraging
he/she/it has been discouraging
we have been discouraging
you have been discouraging
they have been discouraging
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been discouraging
you will have been discouraging
he/she/it will have been discouraging
we will have been discouraging
you will have been discouraging
they will have been discouraging
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been discouraging
you had been discouraging
he/she/it had been discouraging
we had been discouraging
you had been discouraging
they had been discouraging
Conditional
I would discourage
you would discourage
he/she/it would discourage
we would discourage
you would discourage
they would discourage
Past Conditional
I would have discouraged
you would have discouraged
he/she/it would have discouraged
we would have discouraged
you would have discouraged
they would have discouraged
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.discourage - try to prevent; show opposition to; "We should discourage this practice among our youth"
disapprove, reject - deem wrong or inappropriate; "I disapprove of her child rearing methods"
2.discourage - deprive of courage or hope; take away hope from; cause to feel discouraged
cast down, deject, depress, dismay, dispirit, demoralise, demoralize, get down - lower someone's spirits; make downhearted; "These news depressed her"; "The bad state of her child's health demoralizes her"
dishearten, put off - take away the enthusiasm of
intimidate, restrain - to compel or deter by or as if by threats
pour cold water on, throw cold water on - be discouraging or negative about
encourage - inspire with confidence; give hope or courage to
3.discourage - admonish or counsel in terms of someone's behaviordiscourage - admonish or counsel in terms of someone's behavior; "I warned him not to go too far"; "I warn you against false assumptions"; "She warned him to be quiet"
warn - notify of danger, potential harm, or risk; "The director warned him that he might be fired"; "The doctor warned me about the dangers of smoking"
advise, counsel, rede - give advice to; "The teacher counsels troubled students"; "The lawyer counselled me when I was accused of tax fraud"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

discourage

verb
2. put off, deter, prevent, dissuade, talk out of, discountenance a campaign to discourage children from smoking
put off encourage, bid, urge, countenance
3. prevent, check, curb, deter, inhibit, hinder We hope that these measures will discourage further unrest.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

discourage

verb
1. To make less hopeful or enthusiastic:
2. To persuade (a person) not to do something:
Idiom: talk out of.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
يُثَبِّطُيُثَبِّطُ العَزيمَهيُثْني عَنيُحاوِلُ مَنْع
odraditodrazovat odzbavit odvahybránitchtít zabránit
afholde fratage modet fra
lannistaanujertaa
obeshrabriti
elijesztelkedvetlenítelveszi a kedvét
draga kjark úrdraga kjark útletja; fá e-n ofan af e-u
・・・の勇気をくじく
용기를 잃게 하다
atimti drąsą ką nors darytiatimti norą ką nors darytiatimti pasitikėjimą savimidrąsos atėmimasnoro atėmimas
atņemt drosmiatrunātlaupīt drosmi/cerību
odvrnitioplašitivzeti pogum
avråda
ทำให้หมดกำลังใจ
cesaretini kırmakengel olmakönlemekvazgeçirmek
làm nản lòng

discourage

[dɪsˈkʌrɪdʒ] VT
1. (= dishearten) → desanimar, desalentar
to get or become discourageddesanimarse, desalentarse
2. (= deter) [+ offer, advances] → rechazar; [+ tendency, relationship] → oponerse a
smoking is discouragedse recomienda no fumar
3. (= dissuade) to discourage sb from doing sthdisuadir a algn de hacer algo
I don't want to discourage you, butno pretendo disuadirte or desanimarte, pero ...
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

discourage

[dɪsˈkʌrɪdʒ] vt
(= dishearten) [+ person] → décourager
(= dissuade, deter) [+ person] → dissuader, décourager; [+ activity] → décourager, dissuader
to discourage sb from doing sth → dissuader qn de faire qch
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

discourage

vt
(= dishearten)entmutigen; to become discouraged (by)entmutigt werden (von); (= generally disheartened)mutlos werden (durch)
(= dissuade) to discourage somebody from doing somethingjdm abraten, etw zu tun; (successfully) → jdn davon abbringen, etw zu tun
(= deter, hinder)abhalten; friendship, advances, plan, speculation, investmentzu verhindern suchen; praise, evilabwehren; pridenicht ermutigen; smokingunterbinden; the weather discouraged people from going awaydas Wetter hielt die Leute davon ab wegzufahren
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

discourage

[dɪsˈkʌrɪdʒ] vt
a. (dishearten) → scoraggiare
I don't want to discourage you, but ... → non vorrei scoraggiarti, ma...
b. (dissuade, deter) → tentare di dissuadere
to discourage sb from doing sth → tentare di dissuadere qn dal fare qc
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

discourage

(disˈkaridʒ) , ((American) -ˈkə:-) verb
1. to take away the confidence, hope etc of. His lack of success discouraged him.
2. to try to prevent (by showing disapproval etc). She discouraged all his attempts to get to know her.
3. (with from) to persuade against. The rain discouraged him from going camping.
disˈcouragement noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

discourage

يُثَبِّطُ odradit tage modet fra entmutigen αποθαρρύνω desalentar lannistaa décourager obeshrabriti scoraggiare ・・・の勇気をくじく 용기를 잃게 하다 ontmoedigen gjøre motløs zniechęcić desencorajar приводить в уныние avråda ทำให้หมดกำลังใจ cesaretini kırmak làm nản lòng 劝阻
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

discourage

v. desanimar, desalentar;
to ___ fromdisuadir.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
A short account of Jenny Jones, with the difficulties and discouragements which may attend young women in the pursuit of learning.
Behind them was the dark forest they had passed safely through, although they had suffered many discouragements; but before them was a lovely, sunny country that seemed to beckon them on to the Emerald City.
Her heart was set on performing her promise to Tom and Aunt Chloe, and she sighed as discouragements thickened around her.
THE SECOND class of powers, lodged in the general government, consists of those which regulate the intercourse with foreign nations, to wit: to make treaties; to send and receive ambassadors, other public ministers, and consuls; to define and punish piracies and felonies committed on the high seas, and offenses against the law of nations; to regulate foreign commerce, including a power to prohibit, after the year 1808, the importation of slaves, and to lay an intermediate duty of ten dollars per head, as a discouragement to such importations.
When a farmer once got into the habit of going to Cutter, it was like gambling or the lottery; in an hour of discouragement he went back.
The hope of impunity is a strong incitement to sedition; the dread of punishment, a proportionably strong discouragement to it.
He is a most extraordinary young man, and whatever be the event, you must feel that you have created an attachment of no common character; though, young as you are, and little acquainted with the transient, varying, unsteady nature of love, as it generally exists, you cannot be struck as I am with all that is wonderful in a perseverance of this sort against discouragement. With him it is entirely a matter of feeling: he claims no merit in it; perhaps is entitled to none.
This young man was the nephew of one of the Nob Hill magnates, who run the San Francisco Stock Exchange, much as more humble adventurers, in the corner of some public park at home, may be seen to perform the simple artifice of pea and thimble: for their own profit, that is to say, and the discouragement of public gambling.
Dorothea, submitting uneasily to this discouragement, went with Celia into the library, which was her usual drawing-room.
Then he turned back still running, stopping only when he reached the park gate, where he again consulted his watch and then put it away in his pocket, shrugging his shoulders with a gesture of discouragement. He pushed open the park gate, reclosed and locked it, raised his head and, through the bars, perceived us.
- MEET WITH DISCOURAGEMENT. - DIFFICULTIES IN THE WAY OF THE MUSICAL AMATEUR.
Robert had pursued a system of lessons almost daily; and he was nearly at the point of discouragement in realizing the futility of his efforts.