discredit

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dis·cred·it

 (dĭs-krĕd′ĭt)
tr.v. dis·cred·it·ed, dis·cred·it·ing, dis·cred·its
1. To damage in reputation; disgrace: a report on corruption that discredited the mayor.
2. To cause to be doubted or distrusted: new scientific evidence that discredits earlier theories.
3. To refuse to believe: discredit a story as mere gossip.
n.
1. Loss of respect or damage to one's reputation: an incident that brought discredit on the school.
2. Lack or loss of trust or belief; doubt: evidence that brings the popular notion into discredit.
3. Something that brings disgrace or distrust: He is a discredit to his family.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

discredit

(dɪsˈkrɛdɪt)
vb (tr)
1. to damage the reputation of
2. to cause to be disbelieved or distrusted
3. to reject as untrue or of questionable accuracy
n
4. a person, thing, or state of affairs that causes disgrace
5. damage to a reputation
6. lack of belief or confidence
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

dis•cred•it

(dɪsˈkrɛd ɪt)

v.t.
1. to injure the credit or reputation of; defame.
2. to destroy confidence in the reliability of.
3. to give no credence to: to discredit a witness.
n.
4. loss or lack of belief or confidence; distrust.
5. disrepute.
6. something that damages a good reputation.
[1550–60]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

discredit


Past participle: discredited
Gerund: discrediting

Imperative
discredit
discredit
Present
I discredit
you discredit
he/she/it discredits
we discredit
you discredit
they discredit
Preterite
I discredited
you discredited
he/she/it discredited
we discredited
you discredited
they discredited
Present Continuous
I am discrediting
you are discrediting
he/she/it is discrediting
we are discrediting
you are discrediting
they are discrediting
Present Perfect
I have discredited
you have discredited
he/she/it has discredited
we have discredited
you have discredited
they have discredited
Past Continuous
I was discrediting
you were discrediting
he/she/it was discrediting
we were discrediting
you were discrediting
they were discrediting
Past Perfect
I had discredited
you had discredited
he/she/it had discredited
we had discredited
you had discredited
they had discredited
Future
I will discredit
you will discredit
he/she/it will discredit
we will discredit
you will discredit
they will discredit
Future Perfect
I will have discredited
you will have discredited
he/she/it will have discredited
we will have discredited
you will have discredited
they will have discredited
Future Continuous
I will be discrediting
you will be discrediting
he/she/it will be discrediting
we will be discrediting
you will be discrediting
they will be discrediting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been discrediting
you have been discrediting
he/she/it has been discrediting
we have been discrediting
you have been discrediting
they have been discrediting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been discrediting
you will have been discrediting
he/she/it will have been discrediting
we will have been discrediting
you will have been discrediting
they will have been discrediting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been discrediting
you had been discrediting
he/she/it had been discrediting
we had been discrediting
you had been discrediting
they had been discrediting
Conditional
I would discredit
you would discredit
he/she/it would discredit
we would discredit
you would discredit
they would discredit
Past Conditional
I would have discredited
you would have discredited
he/she/it would have discredited
we would have discredited
you would have discredited
they would have discredited
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.discredit - the state of being held in low esteem; "your actions will bring discredit to your name"; "because of the scandal the school has fallen into disrepute"
infamy - evil fame or public reputation
dishonor, dishonour - a state of shame or disgrace; "he was resigned to a life of dishonor"
Verb1.discredit - cause to be distrusted or disbelieved; "The paper discredited the politician with its nasty commentary"
brush aside, brush off, discount, dismiss, disregard, ignore, push aside - bar from attention or consideration; "She dismissed his advances"
2.discredit - damage the reputation of; "This newspaper story discredits the politicians"
disparage, belittle, pick at - express a negative opinion of; "She disparaged her student's efforts"
3.discredit - reject as false; refuse to accept
reject - refuse to accept or acknowledge; "I reject the idea of starting a war"; "The journal rejected the student's paper"
doubt - consider unlikely or have doubts about; "I doubt that she will accept his proposal of marriage"
distrust, mistrust, suspect - regard as untrustworthy; regard with suspicion; have no faith or confidence in
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

discredit

verb
1. disgrace, blame, shame, smear, stain, humiliate, degrade, taint, slur, detract from, disparage, vilify, slander, sully, dishonour, stigmatize, defame, bring into disrepute, bring shame upon He says his accusers are trying to discredit him.
disgrace honour, praise, acclaim, applaud, pay tribute to, commend, laud, big up (slang, chiefly Caribbean)
2. dispute, question, challenge, deny, reject, discount, distrust, mistrust, repudiate, cast doubt on or upon, disbelieve, pooh-pooh They realized there would be problems in discrediting the evidence.
noun
1. disgrace, scandal, shame, disrepute, smear, stigma, censure, slur, ignominy, dishonour, imputation, odium, ill-repute, aspersion His actions have brought discredit on the whole regiment.
disgrace credit, honour, praise, approval, merit, acclaim, acknowledgment, commendation
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

discredit

verb
1. To damage in reputation:
Idiom: be a reproach to.
2. To cause to be no longer believed or valued:
Informal: shoot down.
Idioms: knock the bottom out of, shoot full of holes.
3. To prove or show to be false:
4. To give no credence to:
noun
2. The refusal or reluctance to believe:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
فُقْدان السُّمْعَهيَرْفُض الثِّقَه بِيُشَوِّهُ سُمْعَة
ostudašpatná reputacezničit důvěruzpůsobit hanbu
miskreditvanære
rossz hírbe kever
draga í efakoma óorîi ávansæmd, smán
daryti gėdądiskredituojantis dalykasdiskredituotigėdingaigėdingas
apšaubītdiskreditēt, celt neslavunegodsneslava
diskreditovať
doğru olmadığını göstermekgüvensizlikitibarını sarsmakitimatsızlıkşerefine leke sürmek

discredit

[dɪsˈkredɪt]
A. N (= dishonour) → descrédito m, deshonor m
it was to the general's discredit thatfue un descrédito para el general que ...
to bring discredit (up)on sth/sbdesacreditar algo/a algn, suponer un descrédito para algo/algn
B. VT
1. (= prove untrue) [+ theory] → rebatir, refutar
that theory is now discreditedesa teoría ya ha sido rebatida or refutada
2. (= cast doubt upon) → poner en duda
all his evidence is thus discreditedpor lo tanto se pone en duda todo su testimonio
3. (= sully reputation of) [+ family] → deshonrar, desacreditar; [+ organization, profession] → desacreditar
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

discredit

[dɪsˈkrɛdɪt]
vt
(= cast doubt on) [+ theory, report, claim, policy] → mettre en doute
(= cast a slur on) [+ person, organization] → discréditer
ndiscrédit m
It is to his discredit that he did not manage to avert the disaster → Il est discrédité par le fait de n'avoir pas su éviter le désastre.
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

discredit

vt
(= cast slur/doubt on)diskreditieren
(= disbelieve)keinen Glauben schenken (+dat)
n
no pl (= dishonour, disbelief)Misskredit m; to bring discredit (up)on somebody/somethingjdn/etw in Misskredit bringen
to be a discredit to somebodyeine Schande für jdn sein
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

discredit

[dɪsˈkrɛdɪt] (frm)
1. ndiscredito
to bring discredit on sb/sth → far cadere qn/qc in discredito
2. vtscreditare
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

discredit

(disˈkredit) noun
(something that causes) loss of good reputation.
verb
1. to show (a story etc) to be false.
2. to disgrace.
disˈcreditable adjective
bringing discredit or disgrace.
disˈcreditably adverb
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

discredit

v. desacreditar.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
Captain Bonneville, however, discredits, on the whole, the alleged sagacity of the beaver in this particular, and thinks the animal has no other aim than to get the tree down, without any of the subtle calculation as to its mode or direction of falling.
Have I not explained everything to you with respect to myself which could bear a doubtful meaning, and which the ill-nature of the world had interpreted to my discredit? What can you now have heard to stagger your esteem for me?
Among them, they brought the word 'cynic' into disfavor so deep that any book bearing it was discredited in advance of publication."
I knew absolutely nothing to his discredit. His manners were those of a cultivated and considerate gentleman; and to women a man's manner is the man.
He had always admired the high and mighty old lady, who, in spite of having been only Catherine Spicer of Staten Island, with a father mysteriously discredited, and neither money nor position enough to make people forget it, had allied herself with the head of the wealthy Mingott line, married two of her daughters to "foreigners" (an Italian marquis and an English banker), and put the crowning touch to her audacities by building a large house of pale cream-coloured stone (when brown sandstone seemed as much the only wear as a frock-coat in the afternoon) in an inaccessible wilderness near the Central Park.
Having long discredited the old systems of mysticism, he now began to discredit the old appraisements of morality.
It is a shameful and unblessed thing, to take the scum of people, and wicked condemned men, to be the people with whom you plant; and not only so, but it spoileth the plantation; for they will ever live like rogues, and not fall to work, but be lazy, and do mischief, and spend victuals, and be quickly weary, and then certify over to their country, to the discredit of the plantation.
I then regretted bitterly the pride which since the first few days after the recovery of my reason had forbidden me to repeat my discredited story and insist upon its truth.
A treacherous friend is the most dangerous enemy; and I will say boldly, that both religion and virtue have received more real discredit from hypocrites than the wittiest profligates or infidels could ever cast upon them: nay, farther, as these two, in their purity, are rightly called the bands of civil society, and are indeed the greatest of blessings; so when poisoned and corrupted with fraud, pretence, and affectation, they have become the worst of civil curses, and have enabled men to perpetrate the most cruel mischiefs to their own species.
for by means of this history of your noble and genuine chivalrous deeds, which you say has been printed, the countless stories of fictitious knights-errant with which the world is filled, so much to the injury of morality and the prejudice and discredit of good histories, will have been driven into oblivion."
Where a man in any station had given satisfactory evidence of his fitness for it, a new President would be restrained from attempting a change in favor of a person more agreeable to him, by the apprehension that a discountenance of the Senate might frustrate the attempt, and bring some degree of discredit upon himself.
She wished to discredit it entirely, repeatedly exclaiming, "This must be false!