discursion

discursion

(dɪsˈkɜːʃən; dɪsˈkɜːʒən)
n
1. a movement to and fro
2. a digression
3. a discourse
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Their comments for improvements also range from KDL should have group discursion rooms, the need for more silent study areas, currency of its collection and easy access to them to good sanitation of the restrooms.
The results of the calibration and verification process and discursion of the proposed system are presented in Section 4.
To support this argument, it is necessary to make a brief discursion into the principles governing such appeals.
Discursion: Similarly, to the literature studies, it was observed in this study that there was no significant difference in relation to age.
Those early Levis poems mainly showed a talent for the isolated, striking, somewhat surrealist image, presented without explication or much accompanying discursion, or even much narrative.
In such ways the narrative is an everlively blend that mixes mystical, meditative discursion about what might be termed lunar metaphysics, with many stretches of impressively researched, magisterially marshalled data--"Aquarius, being a firm believer in intellectual husbandry, had gone to work of course on his own statistics" (284)--in which he includes "an encyclopedic survey of the engineering principles underlying the moon launch" (Goldstein 207).
Arguably more importantly, Foucault (1963; 1969) demonstrated that they also act within clearly defined instructional settings that discipline their discursion actions, and that might lead some social actors to self-discipline their discursive actions.
And indeed, the book is as much a discursion on the senses as it is on books--from the smell of the parchment preparations vividly described in Jonathan Wilcox's Introduction, to the--sometimes destructive--touch in Borland's study of a vandalised hagiography and her reminder of the active, multi-sensory nature of medieval visuality.