discus

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discus

a disk thrown in athletic competitions
Not to be confused with:
discuss – talk over; examine a subject
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

dis·cus

 (dĭs′kəs)
n. pl. dis·cus·es
1. Sports
a. A disk, typically wooden, plastic, or rubber with a metal rim, that is thrown for distance in athletic competitions.
b. A track-and-field event in which a discus is thrown.
2. pl. discus Any of several small colorful South American freshwater fish of the genus Symphysodon that have a disk-shaped body and are popular in home aquariums.
3. Something resembling a flat circular plate; a disk.

[Latin; see disk.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

discus

(ˈdɪskəs)
n, pl discuses or disci (ˈdɪskaɪ)
1. (Athletics (Track & Field)) (originally) a circular stone or plate used in throwing competitions by the ancient Greeks
2. (Athletics (Track & Field)) athletics
a. a similar disc-shaped object with a heavy middle thrown by athletes
b. (as modifier): a discus thrower.
3. (Athletics (Track & Field)) the discus the event or sport of throwing the discus
4. (Animals) a South American cichlid fish, Symphysodon discus, that has a compressed coloured body and is a popular aquarium fish
[C17: from Latin, from Greek diskos from dikein to throw]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

dis•cus

(ˈdɪs kəs)

n., pl. dis•cus•es, dis•ci (ˈdɪs aɪ)
1. a circular disk, usu. wooden with a metal rim, for throwing in athletic competition.
2. the sport of throwing this disk for distance.
[1650–60; < Latin < Greek dískos a quoit, discus, disk]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.discus - an athletic competition in which a disk-shaped object is thrown as far as possiblediscus - an athletic competition in which a disk-shaped object is thrown as far as possible
field event - a competition that takes place on a field rather than on a running track
2.discus - a disk used in throwing competitions
disk, disc - a flat circular plate
sports equipment - equipment needed to participate in a particular sport
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
disk
diskos
diszkosz
kringla
discus
disks

discus

[ˈdɪskəs] N (discuses or disci (pl)) (Sport)
1. (= object) → disco m
to throw the discuslanzar el disco
2. (= event) she won a gold medal in the discusganó la medalla de oro en la prueba de disco
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

discus

[ˈdɪskəs]
n
(= competition) → disque m
(= object) → disque m
modif [thrower] → de disque; [champion] → du lancer du disque; [throwing] → du disque; [title, final] → du lancer du disque
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

discus

nDiskus m; in the discus (Sport) → im Diskuswerfen; discus throwerDiskuswerfer(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

discus

[ˈdɪskəs] ndisco
discus thrower → lanciatore/trice di disco
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

discus

(ˈdiskəs) noun
a heavy disc of metal etc thrown in a type of athletic competition.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
The remote control vehicles dart around the in-field collecting discuses, javelins and hammers after each throw and returning them to athletes.
But they also reduce the number of officials on the field which, when you consider that javelins, hammers and discuses are flying about, is better for safety.