diseconomy


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Related to diseconomy: Diseconomies of scale

diseconomy

(ˌdɪsɪˈkɒnəmɪ)
n, pl -mies
(Economics) economics disadvantage, such as lower efficiency or higher average costs, resulting from the scale on which an enterprise produces goods or services
References in periodicals archive ?
copyright infringement, poor Internet connectivity beyond the main cities and the diseconomy of congestion/poor public transport.
This diseconomy of scale in the companies' innovation activities is related to a significantly lower innovation productivity in large pharmaceutical companies.
We should go through this so that in the end to get rid of gas dependence on Russia, to root out corruption in the gas sector and diseconomy when the state pays for the utilities of owners of luxurious palaces and many other shameful phenomena associated with decades-long manipulation of gas prices.
Avoiding the paper-writing diseconomy merely requires having the paper be written by fewer individuals than the number of listed authors.
That long-term diseconomy is just one reason among many to abandon the scenario - unless, of course, you're a downtown landlord.
The main exception was the South, where segregation caused a diseconomy of scale that made the county the default school district and required greater state control to keep blacks out of local governance.
There is a tipping point where higher output results in higher production costs: a diseconomy of scale.
Other crops, touted as solutions to the apparent diseconomy of current methods, offer even worse results.
What the authors interpret as the problem of diverse tastes can equally well be seen as a diseconomy of scale--and, with an elastic demand, the result of a lower cost is higher, not lower, expenditure.
To achieve the reflective effects the architects wanted, columns were spaced 3m apart (closer than strict structural efficiency requires), but results justify the small diseconomy.
There is a size where the complexity of making it work is actually a diseconomy rather than an economy.
1%, pointing to the presence of a mild diseconomy of scale.