diseconomy


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Related to diseconomy: Diseconomies of scale

diseconomy

(ˌdɪsɪˈkɒnəmɪ)
n, pl -mies
(Economics) economics disadvantage, such as lower efficiency or higher average costs, resulting from the scale on which an enterprise produces goods or services
References in periodicals archive ?
In roads, there is a diseconomy of scale, as several narrower roads function much better than one wide road.
These expenses fall under the so-called negative externality, also known as external cost or external diseconomy, because they negatively affect the public since the government had to funnel funding for them.
The hypotheses were tested via a questionnaire (available from the authors on request) consisting of 40 cluster economy and diseconomy items.
This diseconomy of scale in the companies' innovation activities is related to a significantly lower innovation productivity in large pharmaceutical companies.
Avoiding the paper-writing diseconomy merely requires having the paper be written by fewer individuals than the number of listed authors.
That long-term diseconomy is just one reason among many to abandon the scenario - unless, of course, you're a downtown landlord.
(The main exception was the South, where segregation caused a diseconomy of scale that made the county the default school district and required greater state control to keep blacks out of local governance.) They are the nation's most truly "organic communities." Local consolidation advocates in the last century repeatedly used that term.
There is a tipping point where higher output results in higher production costs: a diseconomy of scale.
Other crops, touted as solutions to the apparent diseconomy of current methods, offer even worse results.
What the authors interpret as the problem of diverse tastes can equally well be seen as a diseconomy of scale--and, with an elastic demand, the result of a lower cost is higher, not lower, expenditure.