disemployment

dis·em·ploy

 (dĭs′ĕm-ploi′)
tr.v. dis·em·ployed, dis·em·ploy·ing, dis·em·ploys
To cause (someone) to lose employment.

dis′em·ploy′ment n.

disemployment

(ˌdɪsɪmˈplɔɪmənt)
n
a removal from employment
References in periodicals archive ?
A supplementary analysis of employment for our low-wage groups suggests that this difference may be associated with a complete lack of any disemployment effect from higher wage minima in the 1990s.
For all the prosperity, there is far too much inequality; for all the practiced tolerance, there is too much incivility; for all the push to the center, there is too much recrimination, too much polarization; for all the productivity, there is too much disemployment, too much meanness, too much commercialism; for all the rollback of bureaucracy and welfare statism, there is too much antigovernment paranoia, too much distrust of democracy.
A minimum wage law set above the market clearing wage rate will cause some disemployment effect.
The effect is even smaller if potential disemployment effects of raising the minimum wage are considered.
Finally, it should be observed that if there are disemployment effects we can get some measure of the inefficiency of the minimum wage policy.
The coefficients for industry dummies are all positive and highly significant, indicating that manufacturing firms used as the reference category are more concerned about disemployment effects from the diffusion of AI and robotics.
They include a disemployment effect in their model that varies by worker age, and they account for changes in prices and business profits, all of which have distributional consequences.
Our preferred specifications imply that the disemployment effect of indexing minimum wages to inflation is over 2.5 times the magnitude of the disemployment effect associated with nominal minimum wage increases.
point to much stronger trade disemployment effects (Freeman and Katz 1991; Revenga l992).
depend on contentious projections about the disemployment effects of
The evidence regarding the employment effects of payroll taxes is limited, but the one study noted above suggests large disemployment effects.
The corporate project--to intensify the sphere of high-tech work without also expanding it--is a remedy of the hair-of-the-dog-that-bit-you variety: more disemployment, more super-exploitation.