disenchanting


Also found in: Thesaurus.

dis·en·chant

 (dĭs′ĕn-chănt′)
tr.v. dis·en·chant·ed, dis·en·chant·ing, dis·en·chants
To free from illusion or false belief; undeceive.

[Obsolete French desenchanter, from Old French, to break a spell : des-, dis- + enchanter, to enchant; see enchant.]

dis′en·chant′er n.
dis′en·chant′ing·ly adv.
dis′en·chant′ment n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.disenchanting - freeing from illusion or false belief
convincing - causing one to believe the truth of something; "a convincing story"; "a convincing manner"
References in classic literature ?
When I saw "King Lear" played, nobody was allowed to see a scene shifted; if there was nothing to be done but slide a forest out of the way and expose a temple beyond, one did not see that forest split itself in the middle and go shrieking away, with the accompanying disenchanting spectacle of the hands and heels of the impelling impulse--no, the curtain was always dropped for an instant--one heard not the least movement behind it--but when it went up, the next instant, the forest was gone.
I said to myself that this was a sign that Juliana and her niece(disenchanting idea!) were untidy persons, with a low Italian standard; but I afterward recognized that a lodger who had forced an entrance had no locus standi as a critic.
As self-inflicted reputational damage goes, often disenchanting the first-time visitors and occasional punters the sport must win over, it is a pressing, but also an easy, nonsense to remedy.