diseuse


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di·seuse

 (dē-zœz′, də-)
n.
1. A woman who is a skilled and usually professional storyteller, poet, or other spoken-word performer.
2. A female singer whose performance of song lyrics is especially expressive.

[French, feminine of diseur, monologuist; see diseur.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

diseuse

(French dizœz)
n
(Theatre) (esp formerly) an actress who presents dramatic recitals, usually sung accompanied by music. Male counterpart: diseur
[C19: from French, feminine of diseur speaker, from dire to speak, from Latin dīcere]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
La premiere est Yvette Guilbert que Massenet admire pour ses qualites de diseuse et pour laquelle il envisage un temps d'ecrire des pieces21.
(For instance, the French coined the term diseuse [speakeress] for a woman who half sings in popular music.
This is from an early section of Dictee, "Diseuse": "She mimicks the speaking ...
Just one)." Yet, where Chas diseuse or speaker sputters in staccato, Som's speaker observes the breathlessness of interrogation, which is awash in waves: "Sign here or breach & breathe.
In the Netherlands, however, from 1873 on, she created a furore as a diseuse and actress.
I saw little amusement in using that poignantly beautiful song"I Believe", (sung by the diseuse in Coward's operetta: "Bitter Sweet")as a backup tune for a glum, deeply unfunny, burlesque duo.
On a platform to the right, a Diseuse dances and sings to the accompaniment of a guitarist.
In this self-reflexive mode, the writer, in fact, negates her role as both the scribe and the narrator of these oral stories, wishing that she could sing: "Je ne m'avance ni en diseuse, ni en scripteuse.
Throughout the rest of my project, I emphasize Ng's lack of appeal to the universal message sent out by Theresa Hak Kyung Cha's statement: "Let the one who is diseuse, one who is mother who waits nine days and nine nights be found.
(69.) Noelle Giret, ed., Yvette Guilbert: Diseuse fin de siecle (Paris: Bibliotheque nationale de France, 1995), 77.