disinherit

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dis·in·her·it

 (dĭs′ĭn-hĕr′ĭt)
tr.v. dis·in·her·it·ed, dis·in·her·it·ing, dis·in·her·its
1. To exclude from inheritance or the right to inherit.
2. To deprive of a natural or established right or privilege.

dis′in·her′i·tance n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

disinherit

(ˌdɪsɪnˈhɛrɪt)
vb (tr)
1. (Law) law to deprive (an heir or next of kin) of inheritance or right to inherit
2. (Law) to deprive of a right or heritage
ˌdisinˈheritance n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

dis•in•her•it

(ˌdɪs ɪnˈhɛr ɪt)

v.t.
1. to exclude (an heir) from inheritance.
2. to deprive of a heritage, country, right, privilege, etc.
[1525–35]
dis`in•her′i•tance, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

disinherit


Past participle: disinherited
Gerund: disinheriting

Imperative
disinherit
disinherit
Present
I disinherit
you disinherit
he/she/it disinherits
we disinherit
you disinherit
they disinherit
Preterite
I disinherited
you disinherited
he/she/it disinherited
we disinherited
you disinherited
they disinherited
Present Continuous
I am disinheriting
you are disinheriting
he/she/it is disinheriting
we are disinheriting
you are disinheriting
they are disinheriting
Present Perfect
I have disinherited
you have disinherited
he/she/it has disinherited
we have disinherited
you have disinherited
they have disinherited
Past Continuous
I was disinheriting
you were disinheriting
he/she/it was disinheriting
we were disinheriting
you were disinheriting
they were disinheriting
Past Perfect
I had disinherited
you had disinherited
he/she/it had disinherited
we had disinherited
you had disinherited
they had disinherited
Future
I will disinherit
you will disinherit
he/she/it will disinherit
we will disinherit
you will disinherit
they will disinherit
Future Perfect
I will have disinherited
you will have disinherited
he/she/it will have disinherited
we will have disinherited
you will have disinherited
they will have disinherited
Future Continuous
I will be disinheriting
you will be disinheriting
he/she/it will be disinheriting
we will be disinheriting
you will be disinheriting
they will be disinheriting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been disinheriting
you have been disinheriting
he/she/it has been disinheriting
we have been disinheriting
you have been disinheriting
they have been disinheriting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been disinheriting
you will have been disinheriting
he/she/it will have been disinheriting
we will have been disinheriting
you will have been disinheriting
they will have been disinheriting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been disinheriting
you had been disinheriting
he/she/it had been disinheriting
we had been disinheriting
you had been disinheriting
they had been disinheriting
Conditional
I would disinherit
you would disinherit
he/she/it would disinherit
we would disinherit
you would disinherit
they would disinherit
Past Conditional
I would have disinherited
you would have disinherited
he/she/it would have disinherited
we would have disinherited
you would have disinherited
they would have disinherited
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.disinherit - prevent deliberately (as by making a will) from inheriting
deprive - keep from having, keeping, or obtaining
bequeath, will, leave - leave or give by will after one's death; "My aunt bequeathed me all her jewelry"; "My grandfather left me his entire estate"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

disinherit

verb (Law) cut off, dispossess, disown, cut off without a penny He threatened to disinherit her if she did not end the relationship.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
vydědit

disinherit

[ˈdɪsɪnˈherɪt] VTdesheredar
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

disinherit

[ˌdɪsɪnˈhɛrɪt] vt [+ person, family] → déshériter
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

disinherit

vtenterben
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

disinherit

[ˈdɪsɪnˈhɛrɪt] vtdiseredare
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
They had only remembered certain threats of disinheritance uttered a year or two previously by the uncle (who had no living relative except the nephew), and they had, therefore, always looked upon this disinheritance as a matter that was settled -- so single-minded a race of beings were the Rattleburghers; but the remark of "Old Charley" brought them at once to a consideration of this point, and thus gave them to see the possibility of the threats having been nothing more than a threat.
Saving Aunt Ester's house would mean saving the legacy of a person who represented continuity in a history of disruptions and disinheritances.
Increasingly, it seems disinheritances will not be permitted when they offend community standards.
In this article, we examine the legislation and review some of the factors the courts consider relevant in deciding whether the disinheritance should be permitted.
This involves the fact that there is a certain category of legals heirs of the defunct, named the heirs who are entitled to a portion of an inheritance (formed of succession of the disposer, his parents and the surviving spouse) that the law protects against the gifts in excess of the freely disposable portion of an estate carried out by the defunct through acts mortis causa or inter vivos, as well as against disinheritances made through the will.
Partible inheritance was defined in the New Civil Code as being the "portion from the goods of the inheritance that the heirs who are entitled to a portion of an inheritance have the right in virtue of the law, even if against the wish of the defunct, asserted through gifts and disinheritances" (art.