disinhibit

(redirected from disinhibited)
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dis·in·hib·it

 (dĭs′ĭn-hĭb′ĭt)
tr.v. dis·in·hib·it·ed, dis·in·hib·it·ing, dis·in·hib·its
1. To free (a person) from inhibitions.
2. To terminate or reverse the inhibition of (a neuron, for example).

disinhibit

(ˌdɪsɪnˈhɪbɪt)
vb (tr)
(Psychology) to remove inhibition from
References in periodicals archive ?
It was wildly disinhibited behaviour, causing great offence and distress to your victim.
Political discourse over the past few cycles has disinhibited people from expressing their darkest sentiments.
In females, increased levels of negative self- compassion constructs were consistently associated with increased disinhibited eating; these correlations were the strongest among all explored matrices with respect to self-compassion and eating behaviors.
While disinhibited through drink, she did consent to sex - first with Clayton McDonald and then with Ched Evans.
CASE PRESENTATION: A 78-years-old male inmate with a previous history of hypothyroidism was referred by the Manager of a prestigious Senior Citizen's Home for a psychiatric assessment, since this gentleman was revealing a sexually disinhibited behavior with the other elderly female inmates of the senior citizen's home since July 2015.
She developed uncontrolled emotional component, interspersed with weeping spells, disinhibited demeanor, taking off her clothes in front of her family members, climbing walls and chasing cats and on several occasions had tried to run away from her house for no reason.
If an object can be disinhibited it wasn't erased in the first place.
One woman who lives at nearby Pandongate House, wrote: "As a single female living here myself I would find it extremely galling and dare I say frightening to make my way past groups of noisy, intoxicated, disinhibited people whilst trying to get inside my home.
A psychopath is commonly characterised as a person with a profound lack of empathy and remorse, who behaves in a disinhibited fashion - but not all psychopaths become killers," said Prof Wilson.
Douglas Phillips, MD, and his Wet Read column at the end of every issue for a refreshing look into the dark corners of a disinhibited, unprotected cerebrum to get the real deal on what makes our specialty tick--or not.