disinvite

(redirected from disinvitation)

dis·in·vite

 (dĭs′ĭn-vīt′)
tr.v. dis·in·vit·ed, dis·in·vit·ing, dis·in·vites
To rescind an invitation to: disinvited our friends for dinner because of an emergency.

dis·in·vi·ta′tion (-vĭ-tā′shən) n.

disinvite

(ˌdɪsɪnˈvaɪt)
vb (tr)
obsolete to retract an invitation to

dis•in•vite

(ˌdɪs ɪnˈvaɪt)
v.t. -vit•ed, vit•ing.
to revoke an invitation to (someone).
[1575–80]
References in periodicals archive ?
Speaking is slower - averaging 110 to 150 words per minute; they would have stopped around the above mention of the Disinvitation Database.
Matisyahu's disinvitation from the fest came just a few days after Roy Zafrani, a documentary helmer based in Tel Aviv, learned that his short film "The Other Dreamers" had been rejected from Norway's Human Rights Human Wrongs film festival simply for being Israeli.
As with Scripps's disinvitation of Will, an incident of the Bowdoin sort simply cannot occur in a climate of free expression.
In the open letter, Mr Spedding goes on to say: "We hope that organisers will disinvite Mr Galloway, or if too late for a disinvitation, then at the very least con sider not giving him a platform.
It covers topics including the disinvitation of controversial speakers, grade inflation, core requirements, the role of athletic programs, faculty course loads, and assessing presidential performance.
Falchuk denounced the coalition for its disinvitation and sued it for the right to appear, arguing the two sides entered into a "binding'' contract.
Syrian parties and Iran have played in recent weeks, culminating in the invitation and disinvitation for Iran to participate in Geneva.
That mixed feeling of curiosity, estrangement, and boredom is captured in the disinvitation to intimate viewing built into Bildungsroman's on/off screens.
Almost immediately after the disinvitation was publicized, the University of Michigan sprang into action.
But he will have to answer those who profess that Gujarat's human rights indicators continue to be horrific, a primary reason for his disinvitation from the Wharton Forum.
Jean Porter, a professor of theology at the University of Notre Dame in Indiana, said her biggest concern following the disinvitation "is for the well-being of the church.