disjunction


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dis·junc·tion

 (dĭs-jŭngk′shən)
n.
1. The act of disjoining or the condition of being disjointed.
3. Genetics The separation of homologous chromosomes during meiosis.

disjunction

(dɪsˈdʒʌŋkʃən)
n
1. Also called: disjuncture the act of disconnecting or the state of being disconnected; separation
2. (Biology) cytology the separation of the chromosomes of each homologous pair during the anaphase of meiosis
3. (Logic) logic
a. the operator that forms a compound sentence from two given sentences and corresponds to the English or
b. a sentence so formed. Usually written pq where p, q are the component sentences, it is true (inclusive sense) whenever either or both of the latter are true; the exclusive disjunction, for which there is no symbol, is true when either but not both disjuncts is
c. the relation between such sentences

dis•junc•tion

(dɪsˈdʒʌŋk ʃən)

n.
1. the act of disjoining or the state of being disjoined: a disjunction between thought and action.
2.
a. a compound statement that is true only if at least one of a number of alternatives is true.
b. the relationship between the components of such a proposition, expressed by the word “or.”
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.disjunction - state of being disconnected
separation - the state of lacking unity
separability - the capability of being separated
incoherence, incoherency - lack of cohesion or clarity or organization
2.disjunction - the act of breaking a connection
separation - the act of dividing or disconnecting

disjunction

noun
The act or an instance of separating one thing from another:
Translations

dis·junc·tion

n. disyunción, desunión, separación de cromosomas en la anafase de la división celular.
References in classic literature ?
There may be other belief-feelings, for example in disjunction and implication; also a disbelief-feeling.
A switch made at this age could handle not only the disjunction in weight, but also a similar, annoying disjunction in height [see the height and weight centiles in Figure 2].
One increasingly sees in recent published work (and in dissertations-in-progress) the 1750-1850 periodization, for example, in which independence from Spain (1821) is still taken seriously, but as a watershed, in the sense that one needs to see which way political processes flow on either side, rather than as an epochal disjunction. Guardino also delves below the notoriously chaotic and violence-wracked political life of the young republic to the sub-stratum of what he and others have called political culture: the new rules of the game of politics, in other words, rather than just the epiphenomena of public life.
Evidence of managerial disjunction, leading to a degree of isolation for BIS staff, was discovered.
According to the NIH Roadmap for Medical Research, this communication gap is "limiting professional interest in the field and hampering the clinical research enterprise at a time when it should be expanding." Perhaps nowhere is this more evident than in the disjunction between basic environmental health science research and the application of this knowledge to disease prevention, pathogenesis, and prognosis.
Ironically, there could be a disjunction between that aggregate and the average performance of individuals at the school, for a variety of reasons.
Lourdes's intelligent, if often agitated, perspective on the disjunction between the messiness of human life and the noble ideals of the revolutionary Che she would like to emulate but cannot could easily have been a cheap vehicle for Doval's denunciation of the failures of Cuban socialism.
If Laura Bush does not recognize this disjunction, it is because she chooses not to.
Another illustration of the disjunction between the Bush administration and its devoted GOP supporters was offered immediately after the convention.
Here I consider that conjunction and disjunction are commutative connectives.
A formula is a condition that consists of n [greater than or equal to] 1 atoms combined by the logical operators: [conjunction] (conjunction), [disjunction] (disjunction), [right arrow] (implication), and [logical not] (negation).
The fact that the film is set in Hartford, Connecticut, suggests that its concerns lie not with the overt racial hatred often associated with the contemporary white South, but with subtler forms of prejudice, perhaps even with a disjunction between liberal rhetoric and lived reality more redolent of America since the Civil Rights Acts.