disjunctive


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dis·junc·tive

 (dĭs-jŭngk′tĭv)
adj.
1. Serving to separate or divide.
2. Grammar Serving to establish a relationship of contrast or opposition. The conjunction but in the phrase poor but comfortable is disjunctive.
3. Logic
a. Of a proposition that presents two or more alternative terms.
b. Of a syllogism that contains a disjunction as one premise.
n. Grammar
A disjunctive conjunction.

dis·junc′tive·ly adv.

disjunctive

(dɪsˈdʒʌŋktɪv)
adj
1. serving to disconnect or separate
2. (Grammar) grammar
a. denoting a word, esp a conjunction, that serves to express opposition or contrast: but in the sentence She was poor but she was honest
b. denoting an inflection of pronouns in some languages that is used alone or after a preposition, such as moi in French
3. (Biology) logic Also: alternative relating to, characterized by, or containing disjunction
4. (Logic) logic Also: alternative relating to, characterized by, or containing disjunction
n
5. (Grammar) grammar
a. a disjunctive word, esp a conjunction
b. a disjunctive pronoun
6. (Logic) logic a disjunctive proposition; disjunction
disˈjunctively adv

dis•junc•tive

(dɪsˈdʒʌŋk tɪv)

adj.
1. serving or tending to disjoin.
2.
a. syntactically setting two or more expressions in opposition to each other, as but in poor but happy, or expressing an alternative, as or in this or that.
b. not syntactically dependent upon some particular expression.
3.
a. characterizing logical propositions that include alternatives.
b. (of a syllogism) containing at least one disjunctive proposition as a premise.
n.
4. a disjunctive proposition.
5. a disjunctive word.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Late Latin]
dis•junc′tive•ly, adv.

disjunctive

Used to describe a word that indicates opposition or contrast.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.disjunctive - serving or tending to divide or separate
conjunctive - serving or tending to connect
Translations

disjunctive

[dɪsˈdʒʌŋktɪv] ADJdisyuntivo

disjunctive

(Gram)
adjdisjunktiv
nDisjunktion f
References in periodicals archive ?
In this paper Koellner addresses the question of whether the incompleteness theorems imply that "the mind cannot be mechanized," where this is understood in the specific sense that "the mathematical outputs of the idealized human mind do not coincide with the mathematical outputs of any idealized finite machine." Godel argued that his incompleteness theorems implied a weaker, disjunctive conclusion to the effect that either "the mind cannot be mechanized" or "mathematical truth outstrips the idealized human mind." Others, most notably Lucas and Penrose, have claimed more--they have claimed that the incompleteness theorems actually imply the first disjunct.
A three-judge panel unanimously ruled that the court erred in submitting two different multipart instructions to the jury because there was not substantial evidence to support the use of disjunctive instructions.
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If we deny that identity is a relation that can hold between relata that are indefinitely or infinitely disjunctive, the multiple realizability of these higher-order properties provides reason to deny that they are identical with physical properties.
Ill back up for a moment and quickly remind busy readers that and lets you have it both ways (conjunctive) while or forces you to make a choice (disjunctive).
xor unit 100, where indifference is accommodated into a series of logical operators of disjunctive alternatives.
The CJP also raised questions over the meaning and purpose of these words, adding that the words honest and amin could be interpreted in a conjunctive or disjunctive manner.
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A constraint is a disjunctive rule that has 0 disjuncts in the head, so that it starts with the symbol :-.