disjunctive


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dis·junc·tive

 (dĭs-jŭngk′tĭv)
adj.
1. Serving to separate or divide.
2. Grammar Serving to establish a relationship of contrast or opposition. The conjunction but in the phrase poor but comfortable is disjunctive.
3. Logic
a. Of a proposition that presents two or more alternative terms.
b. Of a syllogism that contains a disjunction as one premise.
n. Grammar
A disjunctive conjunction.

dis·junc′tive·ly adv.

disjunctive

(dɪsˈdʒʌŋktɪv)
adj
1. serving to disconnect or separate
2. (Grammar) grammar
a. denoting a word, esp a conjunction, that serves to express opposition or contrast: but in the sentence She was poor but she was honest
b. denoting an inflection of pronouns in some languages that is used alone or after a preposition, such as moi in French
3. (Biology) logic Also: alternative relating to, characterized by, or containing disjunction
4. (Logic) logic Also: alternative relating to, characterized by, or containing disjunction
n
5. (Grammar) grammar
a. a disjunctive word, esp a conjunction
b. a disjunctive pronoun
6. (Logic) logic a disjunctive proposition; disjunction
disˈjunctively adv

dis•junc•tive

(dɪsˈdʒʌŋk tɪv)

adj.
1. serving or tending to disjoin.
2.
a. syntactically setting two or more expressions in opposition to each other, as but in poor but happy, or expressing an alternative, as or in this or that.
b. not syntactically dependent upon some particular expression.
3.
a. characterizing logical propositions that include alternatives.
b. (of a syllogism) containing at least one disjunctive proposition as a premise.
n.
4. a disjunctive proposition.
5. a disjunctive word.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Late Latin]
dis•junc′tive•ly, adv.

disjunctive

Used to describe a word that indicates opposition or contrast.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.disjunctive - serving or tending to divide or separate
conjunctive - serving or tending to connect
Translations

disjunctive

[dɪsˈdʒʌŋktɪv] ADJdisyuntivo

disjunctive

(Gram)
adjdisjunktiv
nDisjunktion f
References in periodicals archive ?
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