disjuncture


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dis·junc·ture

 (dĭs-jŭngk′chər)
n.
Disjunction; disunion; separation.

disjuncture

(dɪsˈdʒʌŋktʃə)
n
another name for disjunction1

dis•junc•ture

(dɪsˈdʒʌŋk tʃər)

n.
the act of disjoining or the state of being disjoined; disjunction.
[1350–1400; Middle English (< Anglo-French) < Medieval Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.disjuncture - state of being disconnected
separation - the state of lacking unity
separability - the capability of being separated
incoherence, incoherency - lack of cohesion or clarity or organization

disjuncture

noun
The act or an instance of separating one thing from another:
References in periodicals archive ?
I would have wished to engage the late lawyer a little on this view and a lot more on the disjuncture between local needs and global competitiveness that is at the heart of state re-scaling and urban governance.
The committee also said the department should indicate how it will establish cohesive relationships with other departments, like environmental affairs, to avoid disjuncture. The committee also called on the department to provide clarity on mine ownership in South Africa.
How could anyone know it in America?" To him, and countless others, nothing spoke more directly to their profound sense of dislocation than the disjuncture in temporal rhythms between the Old World and the New.
Previous research on youth and their online activities has identified a "privacy paradox"--there is a disjuncture between what youth say about privacy concerns, and the steps they take (or do not take) to protect their privacy when using social media.
The disjuncture among purpose, existence, and belonging in their lives finds voice in the structure of the stories marked by a sense of inescapable fragmentation.
I left Davao happy to have revisited one of my favorite cities, amazed at the rapid pace of development-and somewhat perplexed about the disjuncture between political world views, uncertain where it will lead us.
Both the artist and his environmental circumstances are characterized by a willingness to not only sponge visuals from traditional culture but also to utilize primal forces, disjuncture, and assiduous manual labor.
In modern businesses, communications cannot be held up by a convoluted approvals process and a disjuncture between relevant departments and individuals within an organisation.
In the original symposium, participants grappled with the problematic notion of global digital culture, exploring dynamics of convergence and disjuncture in the digital era.
Like most Australian environmental historians, Morgan laments the disjuncture between knowledge and assumptions imported from Europe and the realities of the Australian environment.
I find the film problematic and emblematic of the Curtis Hanson disjuncture. What I failed to feel, I admired.
"The history of abolition," Sinha compellingly argues, "is marked as much by continuity as by disjuncture" (191).