disloyal

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dis·loy·al

 (dĭs-loi′əl)
adj.
Showing or characterized by a lack of loyalty; not loyal. See Synonyms at faithless.

[Late Middle English, from Old French desloial : des-, dis- + loial, loyal; see loyal.]

dis·loy′al·ist n.
dis·loy′al·ly adv.

disloyal

(dɪsˈlɔɪəl)
adj
not loyal or faithful; deserting one's allegiance or duty
disˈloyally adv

dis•loy•al

(dɪsˈlɔɪ əl)

adj.
false to one's obligations or allegiances; faithless.
[1470–80; < Middle French]
dis•loy′al•ist, n.
dis•loy′al•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.disloyal - showing lack of love for your countrydisloyal - showing lack of love for your country
disloyal - deserting your allegiance or duty to leader or cause or principle; "disloyal aides revealed his indiscretions to the papers"
2.disloyal - deserting your allegiance or duty to leader or cause or principle; "disloyal aides revealed his indiscretions to the papers"
disloyal, unpatriotic - showing lack of love for your country
loyal - steadfast in allegiance or duty; "loyal subjects"; "loyal friends stood by him"

disloyal

disloyal

adjective
Translations
غَيْر مُخْلِص
neloajálnínevěrný
illoyaltroløs
ótrúr
neištikimaineištikimasneištikimybėnelojalus
nelojālsneuzticams
nelojálny
sadakatsızvefasız

disloyal

[ˈdɪsˈlɔɪəl] ADJdesleal (to con)

disloyal

[ˌdɪsˈlɔɪəl] adj [person] → déloyal(e)
to be disloyal to sb → être déloyal(e) envers qn

disloyal

adjilloyal; to be disloyal to somebodyjdm gegenüber nicht loyal sein

disloyal

[ˈdɪsˈlɔɪl] adj disloyal (to)sleale (verso)

disloyal

(disˈloiəl) adjective
unfaithful or not loyal. He has been very disloyal to his friends.
disˈloyally adverb
disˈloyalty noun
References in periodicals archive ?
However, the more frequently one violates party loyalty and the more serious the transgressions, the more the likelihood of action being taken against the disloyalist.
Miss Pankhurst had proved herself a disloyalist, they declared, and Huxham should not have entertained such people at the Government's expense.
The report portrayed most attendees as well-off individuals who provided funds "to assist in furthering the movement for a revolution in America, and [were] at the same time buying themselves protection should the revolution materialize."(70) In May 1920, shortly following the founding of the American Civil Liberties Union, Military Intelligence referred to him as "a dangerous individual,"(71) and as late as 1926, the War Department was still filing accounts proclaiming Baldwin "a disloyalist."(72)
Since May cannot now rely on her own party, polluted as it is with disloyalists, she must show Brussels she has the support of parliament as a whole.