disloyalty


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dis·loy·al·ty

 (dĭs-loi′əl-tē)
n. pl. dis·loy·al·ties
1. The quality of being disloyal; faithlessness.
2. A disloyal act.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

disloyalty

(dɪsˈlɔɪəltɪ)
n, pl -ties
the condition or an instance of being unfaithful or disloyal
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

dis•loy•al•ty

(dɪsˈlɔɪ əl ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. the quality of being disloyal; lack of loyalty; unfaithfulness.
2. violation of allegiance or duty, as to a government.
3. a disloyal act.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Middle French]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Loyalty/Disloyalty

 

See Also: FRIENDSHIP, LOVE

  1. Always at her side like a Great Dane —Carlos Baker
  2. As the rolling stone gathers no moss, so the roving heart gathers no affection —Anna Jameson
  3. Devoted and caretaking as a cat with her kittens —Katherine Anne Porter
  4. (In the end, people’s) devotion hung like rocks around your neck —Alice Munro

    See Also: CLINGING

  5. Endless devotion … like a straitjacket —Lynne Sharon Schwartz
  6. Faithful (to each other) as the Canada goose, more or less —Laurie Colwin
  7. Fickle as spring sunlight —Carolyn Kizer
  8. A heart true as steel —William Shakespeare

    Shakespeare gave this comparison from Midsummer Night’s Dream a slight twist in Romeo and Juliet: “My man’s as true as steel.”

  9. Like a woman in her first love affair, he insisted on unconditional commitment —Ariel Dorfman
  10. Loyal, like a dog —Lynne Sharon Schwartz
  11. Loyalty … small and hard, like buckshot lodged in her stomach —Sarah Litsey
  12. To say that you can love one person all your life is just like saying that one candle will continue burning as long as you live —Leo Tolstoy
  13. True to her husband as the dial to the sun —Henry Fielding
Similes Dictionary, 1st Edition. © 1988 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.disloyalty - the quality of being disloyal
infidelity, unfaithfulness - the quality of being unfaithful
disaffection - disloyalty to the government or to established authority; "the widespread disaffection of the troops"
subversiveness, traitorousness, treason - disloyalty by virtue of subversive behavior
perfidiousness, perfidy, treachery - betrayal of a trust
loyalty, trueness - the quality of being loyal
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

disloyalty

noun treachery, infidelity, breach of trust, double-dealing, falsity, perfidy, unfaithfulness, falseness, betrayal of trust, inconstancy, deceitfulness, breaking of faith, Punic faith Charges of disloyalty had already been made against them.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

disloyalty

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
عَدَم الإخْلاص، خِيانَه
neloajálnost
illoyalitettroløshed
ótryggî, sviksemi
nelojálnosť
sadakatsizlikvefasızlık

disloyalty

[ˈdɪsˈlɔɪəltɪ] Ndeslealtad f (to con)
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

disloyalty

[ˌdɪsˈlɔɪəlti] ndéloyauté f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

disloyalty

nIlloyalität f(to gegenüber)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

disloyalty

[ˈdɪsˈlɔɪltɪ] nslealtà
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

disloyal

(disˈloiəl) adjective
unfaithful or not loyal. He has been very disloyal to his friends.
disˈloyally adverb
disˈloyalty noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
It was a senseless remark, but with a queer feeling of disloyalty Margaret rose from her chair.
"I have buried one friend to-day," he thought: "what if this should cost me another?" And then he condemned the fear as a disloyalty, and broke the seal.
The haste with which these measures were carried into execution did not admit of those preparations for their comfort, which, if unmerited by their disloyalty, were at least due in pity to the severity of their punishment.
With this idea in view she opened negotiations with the two sailors she had imprisoned in the forecastle, and having forced their consent to her plans, upon pain of death should they attempt disloyalty, she released them just as darkness closed about the ship.
"It seems like disloyalty to Matthew, somehow, to find pleasure in these things now that he has gone," she said wistfully to Mrs.
The follies and disloyalty committed in his youth were to be expiated by a long and painful penance, ere he could be restored to the full enjoyment of the confidence of his ancient people; and without confidence there could be no authority in an Indian tribe.
I didn't know then her shrinking from all falsehood and evasion; her dread of insincerity and disloyalty of every kind.
His regret was for his baseless disloyalty to one who had saved the lives of every member of his party, and offered harm to none.
"You lie!" she said quietly, "the Heliumite knows less of disloyalty than he knows of fear, and of fear he is as ignorant as the unhatched young."
Without any sense of disloyalty to Terence and Rachel he ceased to think about either of them.
The vision of that sweet and innocent face floated before me amidst the soft mists of imagination, and where I had on the second believed that I clung only to the memory of a gentle friendship I had lost, yet now it seemed that it would have been disloyalty to her to have said that I did not want Dian the Beautiful as my mate.
Do it by all means, my dear doctor," and there was a touch of the old, friendly, sane tone which had been so long missing, that almost caused von Horn to feel a trace of compunction for the hideous act of disloyalty that he was on the verge of perpetrating.