dismissal


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dis·miss·al

 (dĭs-mĭs′əl)
n.
1.
a. The act of dismissing.
b. The condition of being dismissed.
2. An order or notice of discharge.

dismissal

(dɪsˈmɪsəl)
n
1. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) an official notice of discharge from employment or service
2. the act of dismissing or the condition of being dismissed. Also called: dismission

dis•miss•al

(dɪsˈmɪs əl)

also dis•mis•sion

(-ˈmɪʃ ən)

n.
1. an act or instance of dismissing.
2. the state of being dismissed.
3. a spoken or written order of discharge as from employment.
[1800–10]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dismissal - a judgment disposing of the matter without a trial
judicial decision, judgment, judgement - (law) the determination by a court of competent jurisdiction on matters submitted to it
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
2.dismissal - official notice that you have been fired from your jobdismissal - official notice that you have been fired from your job
notice - advance notification (usually written) of the intention to withdraw from an arrangement of contract; "we received a notice to vacate the premises"; "he gave notice two months before he moved"
marching orders, walking papers - (informal) a notice of dismissal or discharge
3.dismissal - permission to go; the sending away of someone
permission - approval to do something; "he asked permission to leave"
4.dismissal - the termination of someone's employment (leaving them free to depart)
superannuation - the act of discharging someone because of age (especially to cause someone to retire from service on a pension)
ending, termination, conclusion - the act of ending something; "the termination of the agreement"
conge, congee - an abrupt and unceremonious dismissal
removal - dismissal from office
deactivation, inactivation - breaking up a military unit (by transfers or discharges)
honorable discharge - a discharge from the armed forces with a commendable record
dishonorable discharge - a discharge from the armed forces for a grave offense (as sabotage or espionage or cowardice or murder)
Section Eight - a discharge from the US Army based on unfitness or character traits deemed undesirable

dismissal

noun
1. the sack, removal, discharge, notice, the boot (slang), expulsion (informal), the push (slang), marching orders (informal), kiss-off (slang, chiefly U.S. & Canad.), the bum's rush (slang), the (old) heave-ho (informal), the order of the boot (slang), your books or cards (informal) his dismissal from his post
2. rejection, refusal, rebuff, knock-back (slang), kick in the teeth (slang), brushoff (slang) the high-handed dismissal of public opinion

dismissal

noun
1. The act of dismissing or the condition of being dismissed from employment:
Informal: ax.
Slang: boot, bounce, sack.
2. The act of ejecting or the state of being ejected:
Slang: boot, bounce.
Translations
إقالَه، صَرْف، طَرْد
propuštěnízamítnutí
afvisningfyring
uppsögn; frávísun
odpust
işten at maizinreddetme

dismissal

[dɪsˈmɪsəl] N
1. (from job) [of worker] → despido m; [of official] → destitución f
2. [of suggestion, idea] → rechazo m
3. (Jur) → desestimación f

dismissal

[ˌdɪsˈmɪsəl] n
(= sacking) [employee] → renvoi m
[person, witness] → renvoi m
(= rejection) [suggestion, idea, report, problem] → refus m de prendre en considération
(LAW) [appeal, claim] → rejet m
the dismissal of the case → la fin de non-recevoir

dismissal

n
(= firing: from job) → Entlassung f
(= permission to leave)Entlassung f; (of assembly)Auflösung f
(= brushing aside: of point, objection, speculation, claim) → Abtun nt
(Jur, of accused) → Entlassung f; (of appeal)Abweisung f, → Einstellung f; (of case, charges)Abweisung f
(Sport, of batsman, team) → Ausschlagen nt

dismissal

[dɪsˈmɪsl] ncongedo; (of worker) → licenziamento; (of official) → destituzione f; (of assembly) → scioglimento
the dismissal of a case (Law) → il non luogo a procedere

dismiss

(disˈmis) verb
1. to send or put away. She dismissed him with a wave of the hand; Dismiss the idea from your mind!
2. to remove from office or employment. He was dismissed from his post for being lazy.
3. to stop or close (a law-suit etc). Case dismissed!
disˈmissal noun
References in classic literature ?
A CHIEF of Police who had seen an Officer beating a Thug was very indignant, and said he must not do so any more on pain of dismissal.
I have lived, for many years past, in this gentleman's service as house-keeper; and not having received my formal dismissal, I consider myself in his service still.
If she was threatened with dismissal, she impenetrably bowed her head, as much as to say, "Give me the word, and I go.
My fear was of having to deal with the intolerable question of the grounds of his dismissal from school, for that was really but the question of the horrors gathered behind.
If, in half an hour from this, you still insist on my leaving the house, I will accept your ladyship's dismissal, but not your ladyship's money.
But Pelet's fury subsided; a fortnight sufficed for its rise, progress, and extinction: in that space of time the dismissal of the obnoxious teacher had been effected in the neighbouring house, and in the same interval I had declared my resolution to follow and find out my pupil, and upon my application for her address being refused, I had summarily resigned my own post.
They came therefore to a decision, betook themselves in a body to the king, and begged for their dismissal.
She spoke amiably, yet with the least hint of dismissal in her voice.
At length, towards noon, upon the final dismissal of the ship's riggers, and after the Pequod had been hauled out from the wharf, and after the ever-thoughtful Charity had come off in a whaleboat, with her last gift --a night-cap for Stubb, the second mate, her brother-in-law, and a spare bible for the steward -- after all this, the two captains, Peleg and Bildad, issued from the cabin, and turning to the chief mate, Peleg said: Now, Mr.
Well, then, it is but fair that you should be paid for your loss of time and trouble," said the count; and he made a gesture of polite dismissal.
The little multitude await the word of dismissal with almost irrepressible impatience.
Then came letters, then the doctor again and again, and finally my dismissal in the incredible words which have necessitated these explanations.