dismissed


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dis·miss

 (dĭs-mĭs′)
tr.v. dis·missed, dis·miss·ing, dis·miss·es
1. To end the employment or service of; discharge.
2. To direct or allow to leave: dismissed troops after the inspection; dismissed the student after reprimanding him.
3.
a. To stop considering; rid one's mind of; dispel: dismissed all thoughts of running for office.
b. To refuse to accept or recognize; reject: dismissed the claim as highly improbable.
4. Law To adjudicate (a cause of action) as insufficient to proceed further in court because of some deficiency in law or fact.
5. Sports
a. To eject (a player or coach) for the remainder of a game.
b. To put out (a batter) in cricket.

[Middle English dismissen, from Medieval Latin dismittere, dismiss-, variant of Latin dīmittere : dī-, dis-, apart; see dis- + mittere, to send.]

dis·miss′i·ble adj.
dis·mis′sion (-mĭsh′ən) n.
Synonyms: dismiss, boot1, bounce, can2, discharge, fire, sack1
These verbs mean to terminate the employment of: was dismissed for insubordination; was booted for being late; afraid of being bounced for union activities; wasn't canned because his uncle owns the business; resort workers discharged at the end of the season; was fired unjustly; a reporter sacked for revealing a confidential source. See Also Synonyms at eject.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.dismissed - having lost your job
unemployed - not engaged in a gainful occupation; "unemployed workers marched on the capital"
Translations
References in classic literature ?
She dismissed him by a gesture; and, returning to the table, pointed to the letter.
"Has the young lady dismissed her aunt's servants?" she asked.
But as soon as they realized that the huge log was motionless, they swam again to the top of the water, dismissed their fears, climbed up, and began squatting on it in contempt.
"Your Honour," said the defendant's attorney, when the case was called, "I move that this astonishing action be dismissed. Not only is my client in no way responsible for the loss, but he distinctly foreshadowed the very thing that caused it."
I must torment my sister-in-law for the insolent triumph of her look and manner since Sir James has been dismissed; for, in reconciling Reginald to me, I was not able to save that ill-fated young man; and I must make myself amends for the humiliation to which I have stooped within these few days.
"Mademoiselle Henri has left your establishment--been dismissed, I presume?"
she was not dismissed; I can say with truth, monsieur, that since I became the head of this establishment no master or teacher has ever been dismissed from it."
If you had dismissed me when your insolent fellow seized on me it the street, and brought me to you, and when you yourself acknowledged I was not the person, I would have put it by, and not taken it ill, because of the many ill things I believe you have put upon you daily; but your treatment of me since has been insufferable, and especially that of your servant; I must and will have reparation for that.'
The mercer indeed made a long harangue of the great loss they have daily by lifters and thieves; that it was easy for them to mistake, and that when he found it he would have dismissed me, etc., as above.
I declare to you, on the faith of a gentleman, that I have long dismissed it from my mind.
On this very 2nd of October he had dismissed James Forster, because that luckless youth had brought him shaving-water at eighty-four degrees Fahrenheit instead of eighty-six; and he was awaiting his successor, who was due at the house between eleven and half-past.
"Have dismissed Cathcart for incompetence - road started - progress magnificent," he wired one week, and shortly afterwards a message came back - "Cathcart cables resigned - scheme impossible - shares dropping - wire reply."