disomic


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Related to disomic: monosomic

disomic

(daɪˈsəʊmɪk)
adj
(Genetics) genetics having an extra chromosome in the haploid state that is homologous to an existing chromosome in this set
diˈsomy n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
If additional signals were present in the cell, they were disomic for autosomes (Figure 2A) and diploid for sex chromosomes (Figure 2B).
Increased incidence of disomic sperm nuclei in a 47, XYY male assessed by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH).
Creen arrow showing average red (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 [HER2]) signals, 4 to 5 per cell, with disomic CEP17 (green) signals, whereas HER2 showed classical amplification with multiple green (HER2) signals (blue arrow) when interpreted in relation to D17S122 reference loci (original magnification X1000).
These complicated and varied phenotypes are generally thought to result from the imbalance between the expression of trisomic genes on chromosome 21 and disomic genes on other chromosomes, resulting into abnormal gene dose.
In this study, our aim was to eliminate an entire chromosome in human cells to generate normal disomic cells from trisomic cells.
Sex-chromosome disomy was the primary outcome of interest because of its reproductive health impacts: a) it is the most frequent form of sperm aneuploidy and occurs twice as frequently as autosomal disomy; b) sperm that are disomic for X or Y are capable of fertilization; and c) sex-chromosome disomy results in viable offspring.
A sample was defined as 'normal disomic' when the fluorescent ratio was ~1.0 for all loci analysed.
A detailed RFLP map of cotton, Gossypium hirsutum A- Gossypium barbadense: chromosome organization and evolution in a disomic polyploidy genome.
Duplicate loci ([IDH-3,4.sup.*] and [MDH-3,4.sup.*]) were treated as two disomic loci with identical allele frequencies because allele variation could not be assigned to a specific locus (Allendorf & Thorgaard, 1984), although this treatment tends to give conservative estimates of heterozygosity and genetic differentiation (Krueger et al., 1989).