dispersant

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dis·per·sant

 (dĭ-spûr′sənt)
n. Chemistry
A substance added to a mixture to promote dispersion or to maintain dispersed particles in suspension.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dispersant

(dɪsˈpɜːsənt)
n
(Chemical Engineering) a liquid or gas used to disperse small particles or droplets, as in an aerosol
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

dis•per•sant

(dɪˈspɜr sənt)

n.
any admixture to a chemical dispersion capable of maintaining the dispersed particles in suspension.
[1940–45]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations
분산제

dispersant

[dɪsˈpɜːsənt] N (Chem) → dispersante m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

dispersant

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Our first-rate functional expertise with anti-scaling dispersants, anti-soiling technologies, rheology modifiers, conditioning polymers, UV boosters and light management helps us develop new applications for our technologies in adjacent spaces.
Pigments are not readily dispersible in liquid vehicles and require dispersants. Polymeric emulsion polymers improve print performance, but they tend to be insoluble, clog nozzles, and agglomerate pigments.
Chemical dispersants are frequently used to treat oil spills.
Dispersants are the stabilizing agents in a pigment dispersion and are commonly based on polymeric, and often complex, structures.
ADM will begin distributing its proven range of dispersants products in the EU, with the appointment of Hamburg-based chemical distribution company, Lehmann & Voss & Co.
"Baby" corals of at least some species are vulnerable to Deepwater Horizon oil and are especially likely to die when exposed to dispersants used during a spill, according to a lab-based study by Mote scientists published in the journal PLOS ONE earlier this year.
Pedigo has aggressively challenged the EPA for, as he alleges, "not adhering to the spirit of the very Clean Water Act that the EPA is there to enforce by pre approving toxic Corexit dispersants."
DOW Coating Materials says it will produce more dispersants to meet fast growing demand from customers across the world.
Different concentrations of water-soluble chitosan (C06, Charming & Beauty, Taiwan) [5, 10, 20, 46] were added to the CWNFs as dispersants to investigate how the amount of added dispersant affected their suspension performance and agglomeration behavior.
The researchers warned that using such dispersants in oil spills near shore could allow these chemicals to penetrate sands deeply enough to threaten groundwater supplies.
Shell, which said the leak has been stopped, has estimated that less than 40,000 barrels of crude have spilled into the sea and deployed ships with dispersants to attack the slick.
(12) Next, this Note will examine the decision to utilize dispersants to combat the oil spill.