dispiritedly


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Related to dispiritedly: inconsideration

dis·pir·it·ed

 (dĭ-spĭr′ĭ-tĭd)
adj.
Affected or marked by low spirits; dejected. See Synonyms at depressed.

dis·pir′it·ed·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.dispiritedly - in a dispirited manner without hope; "the first Mozartian opera to be subjected to this curious treatment ran dispiritedly for five performances"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

dispiritedly

[dɪsˈpɪrɪtɪdlɪ] ADVcon desánimo, con desaliento
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

dispiritedly

[dɪsˈpɪrɪtɪdlɪ] advcon aria abbattuta, con aria scoraggiata; (speak) → con tono avvilito
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
'Oh, it's finished,' said Annette, dispiritedly. 'Published too, for that matter.'
It shivered in the chill morning wind, and grinned dispiritedly when the man spoke to it in a voice that achieved no more than a hoarse whisper.
Sanya later wrote dispiritedly that young people he spoke with were happy to trash the mission schoolmasters' assertions of Christianity's superiority, but were unable to give any counterarguments.
Steel-gray skies opened up to release fat droplets of rain as I stared dispiritedly from my hotel window, wishing I had chosen to spend this particular birthday in Hawaii.
"As I'm the youngest, the big vehicles give them more money than me," she says dispiritedly.
Most often you write some kind of tepid "well, okay, but ..." that pleases nobody and either protects readers from a book they never would have noticed in the first place or dispiritedly leads them toward a book they won't go get and from whose absence they won't suffer.
And Carlyle, what did he reply?" "By Gad she'd better," I'd answer dispiritedly. Alger Hiss was a stellar exception.
Joseph Anderson, a friend of Schroder's who was returning to Afghanistan--somewhat dispiritedly, believing that Americans had lost interest in what was happening there.
She is probably his age, he thinks dispiritedly. Attentive as she is, she is late.
On the other hand, Daniel Harris describes his act of reading the Romantics: "After I polished off Coleridge, who was no sooner read than forgotten, I would just as dispiritedly plow through the complete Shelley and again read every fragment, hymn, stray stanza, epitaph, dirge, epithalamium, song, and poetic drama, never stopping for a second to consider whether [...] I made any aesthetic distinction between "Adonais" and the footnotes at the bottom of the page" (210).
"Immobilized by her lack of creativity, the winged goddess sits dispiritedly surrounded by the tools and instruments she has lost the inspiration to use," according to the Cleveland Museum website.