disport


Also found in: Thesaurus.
Related to disport: Dysport

dis·port

 (dĭ-spôrt′)
v. dis·port·ed, dis·port·ing, dis·ports
v.intr.
To amuse oneself in a light, frolicsome manner.
v.tr.
1. To amuse (oneself) in a light, frolicsome manner.
2. To display.
n.
Frolicsome diversion.

[Middle English disporten, from Old French desporter, to divert : des-, apart; see dis- + porter, to carry (from Latin portāre; see port5).]

disport

(dɪˈspɔːt)
vb
1. (tr) to indulge (oneself) in pleasure
2. (intr) to frolic or gambol
n
archaic amusement
[C14: from Anglo-French desporter, from des- dis-1 + porter to carry]

dis•port

(dɪˈspɔrt, -ˈspoʊrt)

v.t.
1. to amuse (oneself).
2. to display (oneself) in a sportive manner.
v.i.
3. to divert oneself; sport.
n.
4. diversion; play.
[1275–1325; Middle English < Anglo-French desporter=des- dis-1 + porter to carry]
dis•port′ment, n.

disport


Past participle: disported
Gerund: disporting

Imperative
disport
disport
Present
I disport
you disport
he/she/it disports
we disport
you disport
they disport
Preterite
I disported
you disported
he/she/it disported
we disported
you disported
they disported
Present Continuous
I am disporting
you are disporting
he/she/it is disporting
we are disporting
you are disporting
they are disporting
Present Perfect
I have disported
you have disported
he/she/it has disported
we have disported
you have disported
they have disported
Past Continuous
I was disporting
you were disporting
he/she/it was disporting
we were disporting
you were disporting
they were disporting
Past Perfect
I had disported
you had disported
he/she/it had disported
we had disported
you had disported
they had disported
Future
I will disport
you will disport
he/she/it will disport
we will disport
you will disport
they will disport
Future Perfect
I will have disported
you will have disported
he/she/it will have disported
we will have disported
you will have disported
they will have disported
Future Continuous
I will be disporting
you will be disporting
he/she/it will be disporting
we will be disporting
you will be disporting
they will be disporting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been disporting
you have been disporting
he/she/it has been disporting
we have been disporting
you have been disporting
they have been disporting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been disporting
you will have been disporting
he/she/it will have been disporting
we will have been disporting
you will have been disporting
they will have been disporting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been disporting
you had been disporting
he/she/it had been disporting
we had been disporting
you had been disporting
they had been disporting
Conditional
I would disport
you would disport
he/she/it would disport
we would disport
you would disport
they would disport
Past Conditional
I would have disported
you would have disported
he/she/it would have disported
we would have disported
you would have disported
they would have disported
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.disport - occupy in an agreeable, entertaining or pleasant fashiondisport - occupy in an agreeable, entertaining or pleasant fashion; "The play amused the ladies"
entertain - provide entertainment for
2.disport - play boisterously; "The children frolicked in the garden"; "the gamboling lambs in the meadows"; "The toddlers romped in the playroom"
play - be at play; be engaged in playful activity; amuse oneself in a way characteristic of children; "The kids were playing outside all day"; "I used to play with trucks as a little girl"

disport

verb
1. To occupy oneself with amusement or diversion:
2. To make a public and usually ostentatious show of:
noun
Activity engaged in for relaxation and amusement:
Translations

disport

[dɪsˈpɔːt] VT to disport o.sdivertirse

disport

[dɪˈspɔːrt] vt (humorous) to disport o.s. → folâtrer

disport

vr (old)sich ergötzen (old)
References in classic literature ?
The stars, as if knowing that no one was looking at them, began to disport themselves in the dark sky: now flaring up, now vanishing, now trembling, they were busy whispering something gladsome and mysterious to one another.
It so happened, then, that Rocinante took a fancy to disport himself with their ladyships the ponies, and abandoning his usual gait and demeanour as he scented them, he, without asking leave of his master, got up a briskish little trot and hastened to make known his wishes to them; they, however, it seemed, preferred their pasture to him, and received him with their heels and teeth to such effect that they soon broke his girths and left him naked without a saddle to cover him; but what must have been worse to him was that the carriers, seeing the violence he was offering to their mares, came running up armed with stakes, and so belaboured him that they brought him sorely battered to the ground.
The soil was thickly studded with cocoa-nut, papaw, and cotton-wood trees, above which the balloon seemed to disport itself like a bird.
Now, however, it is time for the Achaeans to prepare supper while there is still daylight, and then otherwise to disport themselves with song and dance which are the crowning ornaments of a banquet."
On occasion, when a school of blackfish disported by, each one of them a whale of respectable size, Nishikanta would be beside himself in the ecstasy of inflicting pain.
Having disburdened himself of everything he had to relate to his bathing friends, he left them to their aquatic disports, and proceeded onward with the captain and his companions.
The company indeed was perfectly assorted, since all the members belonged to the little inner group of people who, during the long New York season, disported themselves together daily and nightly with apparently undiminished zest.
With Ruskin, Burne-Jones, and Watts, he had put aside his bowler hat and the neat blue tie with white spots which he had worn on coming to Paris; and now disported himself in a soft, broad-brimmed hat, a flowing black cravat, and a cape of romantic cut.
He forgot that she had made life a burden to him, and when she disported herself around him he responded solemnly, striving to be playful and becoming no more than ridiculous.
Of course, there were many light-footed, shrill-voiced American girls, handsome, lifeless-looking English ditto, and a few plain but piquante French demoiselles, likewise the usual set of traveling young gentlemen who disported themselves gaily, while mammas of all nations lined the walls and smiled upon them benignly when they danced with their daughters.
Among the votaries of TERPSICHORE, who disported themselves until Sol gave warning for departure, Wilkins Micawber, Esquire, Junior, and the lovely and accomplished Miss Helena, fourth daughter of Doctor Mell, were particularly remarkable.'
In other disport areas across the country, the vessels carrying imported rice have started to arrive.