disprivilege

disprivilege

(dɪsˈprɪvɪlɪdʒ)
vb (tr)
to deprive of privilege
References in periodicals archive ?
This disprivilege was compounded by classifications based on skin color.
Max Weber once theorized that oppressed peoples develop a "theodicy of disprivilege," a way of explaining to themselves (and compensating for) their persecution, and that the most common such theodicy is the assertion by the oppressed of their superior moral virtue.
1) Race in America is both real and socially (including legally) constructed; it is a real social phenomenon of groups constituted by projected and correlatively experienced relations among their memberships of superiority and inferiority, patronage and clientage, privilege and disprivilege.
The concept involves financially secure, organizationally stable middle-income congregations addressing the full gamut of human disprivilege found in the inner city.
What is mistakenly often seen as tradition--attachment to the past as a value for itself--is better viewed as a way of maintaining title to power, wealth, and status in the present, or as a nostalgic spiritual contrast to present disprivilege.
The pain of the perception of a new psychological disprivilege within an old privilege gnaws at contemporary white people.
Daniela's comment in (j), which addresses a previous remark produced by Maria Brito, in (f) above, disprivileges binary oppositions such as man/woman and homo/hetero and, defying the vertical axis of normative sexuality, challenges her interlocutor to change her daughter's conservative mindset through education.
Most importantly, exploring the ways in which black trans men navigate the privileges and disprivileges of masculinity, both inside and outside the LGBT community, only extends the possibilities of what transgender means.
Also attractive are new sexual-ethical issues like emergency contraception and anything that disprivileges children, adolescents or vulnerable women.