disputation

(redirected from disputations)
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Related to disputations: disputatious

dis·pu·ta·tion

 (dĭs′pyə-tā′shən)
n.
1. The act of disputing; debate.
2. An academic exercise consisting of a formal debate or an oral defense of a thesis.

disputation

(ˌdɪspjʊˈteɪʃən)
n
1. the act or an instance of arguing
2. (Education) a formal academic debate on a thesis
3. an obsolete word for conversation

dis•pu•ta•tion

(ˌdɪs pyʊˈteɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act of disputing or debating; verbal controversy; discussion or debate.
2. an academic exercise stressing the formal arguing of a thesis.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin]

disputation

a controversial debate or discussion; a dispute. See also speech. — disputant, n.
See also: Argumentation
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.disputation - the formal presentation of a stated proposition and the opposition to it (usually followed by a vote)
oral presentation, public speaking, speechmaking, speaking - delivering an address to a public audience; "people came to see the candidates and hear the speechmaking"
2.disputation - a contentious speech actdisputation - a contentious speech act; a dispute where there is strong disagreement; "they were involved in a violent argument"
difference of opinion, dispute, difference, conflict - a disagreement or argument about something important; "he had a dispute with his wife"; "there were irreconcilable differences"; "the familiar conflict between Republicans and Democrats"
argle-bargle, argy-bargy - a verbal dispute; a wrangling argument
firestorm - an outburst of controversy; "the incident triggered a political firestorm"
sparring - an argument in which the participants are trying to gain some advantage
polemic - a controversy (especially over a belief or dogma)
fight - an intense verbal dispute; "a violent fight over the bill is expected in the Senate"

disputation

noun dispute, debate, controversy, polemics, dissension, argumentation after much legal disputation

disputation

noun
The presentation of an argument or arguments:
Translations
جَدَل، نِزاع
debatadiskuse
disput
kappræîa

disputation

[ˌdɪspjuːˈteɪʃən] Ndebate m

disputation

nDisput m, → Kontroverse f

dispute

(diˈspjuːt) verb
1. to argue against or deny. I'm not disputing what you say.
2. to argue (about). They disputed the ownership of the land for years.
noun
(an) argument or quarrel. a dispute over wages.
diˈsputable adjective
able to be argued about. Whether this change was an improvement is disputable.
ˌdispuˈtation noun
a formal argument.
References in classic literature ?
Their letters and disputations on this subject, enlivened on both sides with much wit and learning, will ever bear a conspicuous place in the literary history of the seventeenth century.
And further, I have never observed that any truth before unknown has been brought to light by the disputations that are practised in the schools; for while each strives for the victory, each is much more occupied in making the best of mere verisimilitude, than in weighing the reasons on both sides of the question; and those who have been long good advocates are not afterwards on that account the better judges.
 And disputations dire that lamed their limbs)
No matter how high a statesman may stand, he is certain to have some household drudge, before whom he is weak, undecided, disputations with fate, self- questioning, self-answering, and buckling for the fight.
He thought of their fellows who were "out," and of the approaching disputations of the afternoon.
But heresies have polluted every church, and schisms are the fruit of disputation.
Venerable trapper, our communications have a recent origin, or thy interrogatory might have a tendency to embroil us in angry disputation.
A committee of three from each side was appointed, and after months of disputation, a treaty of peace was drawn up and signed.
Hunsden's excitations she put by soon with a smile, and recurring to the theme of disputation, said--
I live professionally in an atmosphere of disputation, Mr.
Casaubon, that he arranged for the purchase of the picture in which Saint Thomas Aquinas sat among the doctors of the Church in a disputation too abstract to be represented, but listened to with more or less attention by an audience above.
In attending the school lessons and exercises, he would feel at home with the lectures and disputations.