disquisition


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dis·qui·si·tion

 (dĭs′kwĭ-zĭsh′ən)
n.
A formal discourse on a subject, often in writing.

[Latin disquīsītiō, disquīsītiōn-, investigation, from disquīsītus, past participle of disquīrere, to investigate : dis-, dis- + quaerere, to search for.]

disquisition

(ˌdɪskwɪˈzɪʃən)
n
(Education) a formal written or oral examination of a subject
[C17: from Latin disquīsītiō, from disquīrere to make an investigation, from dis-1 + quaerere to seek]
ˌdisquiˈsitional adj

dis•qui•si•tion

(ˌdɪs kwəˈzɪʃ ən)

n.
a formal discourse or treatise in which a subject is examined and discussed; dissertation.
[1595–1605; < Latin disquīsītiō=disquīsī-, variant s. of disquīrere to investigate]
dis`qui•si′tion•al, adj.

disquisition

- A diligent or systematic search, a thorough investigation or research.
See also related terms for research.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.disquisition - an elaborate analytical or explanatory essay or discussion
essay - an analytic or interpretive literary composition

disquisition

noun lecture, discourse, exposition, dissertation, paper, essay, thesis, treatise She launched into an authoritative disquisition.

disquisition

noun
A formal, lengthy exposition of a topic:
Translations

disquisition

[ˌdɪskwɪˈzɪʃən] Ndisquisición f

disquisition

[ˌdɪskwɪˈzɪʃən] n (formal) (in speech)discours m; (written)dissertation f, étude f

disquisition

n(lange, ausführliche) Abhandlung or (speech) → Rede (→ on über +acc)
References in classic literature ?
And the better those are who are governed the better also is the government, as for instance of man, rather than the brute creation: for the more excellent the materials are with which the work is finished, the more excellent certainly is the work; and wherever there is a governor and a governed, there certainly is some work produced; for whatsoever is composed of many parts, which jointly become one, whether conjunct or separate, evidently show the marks of governing and governed; and this is true of every living thing in all nature; nay, even in some things which partake not of life, as in music; but this probably would be a disquisition too foreign to our present purpose.
And the question of the subject of the picture having brought him to one of his favorite theories, Golenishtchev launched forth into a disquisition on it.
What women mean by "trusting" might afford a subject for an interesting disquisition.
Sense, perception, judgment, desire, volition, memory, imagination, are found to be separated by such delicate shades and minute gradations that their boundaries have eluded the most subtle investigations, and remain a pregnant source of ingenious disquisition and controversy.
After I had observed every flower, and listened to a disquisition on every plant, I was permitted to depart; but first, with great pomp, he plucked a polyanthus and presented it to me, as one conferring a prodigious favour.
But he checked all such wayward fancies, and held himself rigidly down to his disquisition.
The general pause which succeeded his short disquisition on the state of the nation was put an end to by Catherine, who, in rather a solemn tone of voice, uttered these words, "I have heard that something very shocking indeed will soon come out in London.
Mohegan heard this disquisition quite patiently, and, when Richard concluded, he held out the basket which contained his specifics, indicating, by a gesture, that he might hold it.
She got the name; but she got also a disquisition upon the proper method of making roads.
And he favoured us all with a long and minute disquisition upon the evils and dangers attendant upon damp feet, delivered with the most imperturbable gravity, amid the jeers and laughter of Mr.
In the form in which it is presented here it has been pruned of all allusions to their common past, of all asides, disquisitions, and explanations addressed directly to the friend of his childhood.
IN DISQUISITIONS of every kind, there are certain primary truths, or first principles, upon which all subsequent reasonings must depend.