disquisition

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dis·qui·si·tion

 (dĭs′kwĭ-zĭsh′ən)
n.
A formal discourse on a subject, often in writing.

[Latin disquīsītiō, disquīsītiōn-, investigation, from disquīsītus, past participle of disquīrere, to investigate : dis-, dis- + quaerere, to search for.]

disquisition

(ˌdɪskwɪˈzɪʃən)
n
(Education) a formal written or oral examination of a subject
[C17: from Latin disquīsītiō, from disquīrere to make an investigation, from dis-1 + quaerere to seek]
ˌdisquiˈsitional adj

dis•qui•si•tion

(ˌdɪs kwəˈzɪʃ ən)

n.
a formal discourse or treatise in which a subject is examined and discussed; dissertation.
[1595–1605; < Latin disquīsītiō=disquīsī-, variant s. of disquīrere to investigate]
dis`qui•si′tion•al, adj.

disquisition

- A diligent or systematic search, a thorough investigation or research.
See also related terms for research.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.disquisition - an elaborate analytical or explanatory essay or discussion
essay - an analytic or interpretive literary composition

disquisition

noun lecture, discourse, exposition, dissertation, paper, essay, thesis, treatise She launched into an authoritative disquisition.

disquisition

noun
A formal, lengthy exposition of a topic:
Translations

disquisition

[ˌdɪskwɪˈzɪʃən] Ndisquisición f

disquisition

[ˌdɪskwɪˈzɪʃən] n (formal) (in speech)discours m; (written)dissertation f, étude f

disquisition

n(lange, ausführliche) Abhandlung or (speech) → Rede (→ on über +acc)
References in classic literature ?
He had a practical mind and moved uneasily amid the abstract; but he found an unexpected fascination in listening to metaphysical disquisitions; they made him breathless; it was a little like watching a tight-rope dancer doing perilous feats over an abyss; but it was very exciting.
In the form in which it is presented here it has been pruned of all allusions to their common past, of all asides, disquisitions, and explanations addressed directly to the friend of his childhood.
IN DISQUISITIONS of every kind, there are certain primary truths, or first principles, upon which all subsequent reasonings must depend.
On the other hand, I compared the disquisitions of the ancient moralists to very towering and magnificent palaces with no better foundation than sand and mud: they laud the virtues very highly, and exhibit them as estimable far above anything on earth; but they give us no adequate criterion of virtue, and frequently that which they designate with so fine a name is but apathy, or pride, or despair, or parricide.
The many excellent friends I have made, since my arrival in this hemisphere, has bound my heart to them to all eternity; and I will now proceed with my philosophical and profound disquisitions on what I have seen, with a perfect confidence that I shall receive credit, and an independence of opinion that is much too dear to me to consent to place it in question.
In the morning he had a spin in the ice-boat with his hostess and a few of the hardier guests; in the afternoon he "went over the farm" with Reggie, and listened, in the elaborately appointed stables, to long and impressive disquisitions on the horse; after tea he talked in a corner of the firelit hall with a young lady who had professed herself broken-hearted when his engagement was announced, but was now eager to tell him of her own matrimonial hopes; and finally, about midnight, he assisted in putting a gold-fish in one visitor's bed, dressed up a burglar in the bath-room of a nervous aunt, and saw in the small hours by joining in a pillow-fight that ranged from the nurseries to the basement.
The disquisitions upon death and suicide were calculated to fill me with wonder.
In this ambition he achieved a remarkable and immediate success, by the publication of a little book entitled 'Euphues and His Anatomie of Wit.' 'Euphues' means 'the well-bred man,' and though there is a slight action, the work is mainly a series of moralizing disquisitions (mostly rearranged from Sir Thomas North's translation of 'The Dial of Princes' of the Spaniard Guevara) on love, religion, and conduct.
And the better those are who are governed the better also is the government, as for instance of man, rather than the brute creation: for the more excellent the materials are with which the work is finished, the more excellent certainly is the work; and wherever there is a governor and a governed, there certainly is some work produced; for whatsoever is composed of many parts, which jointly become one, whether conjunct or separate, evidently show the marks of governing and governed; and this is true of every living thing in all nature; nay, even in some things which partake not of life, as in music; but this probably would be a disquisition too foreign to our present purpose.
And the question of the subject of the picture having brought him to one of his favorite theories, Golenishtchev launched forth into a disquisition on it.
What women mean by "trusting" might afford a subject for an interesting disquisition. However, I forbore to pursue the matter, and answered Rosalind's remark in a practical spirit.
Sense, perception, judgment, desire, volition, memory, imagination, are found to be separated by such delicate shades and minute gradations that their boundaries have eluded the most subtle investigations, and remain a pregnant source of ingenious disquisition and controversy.