disrepute


Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms.

dis·re·pute

 (dĭs′rĭ-pyo͞ot′)
n.
Damage to or loss of reputation.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

disrepute

(ˌdɪsrɪˈpjuːt)
n
a loss or lack of credit or repute. Also (archaic): disreputation
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

dis•re•pute

(ˌdɪs rɪˈpyut)

n.
bad repute; disfavor.
[1645–55]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.disrepute - the state of being held in low esteem; "your actions will bring discredit to your name"; "because of the scandal the school has fallen into disrepute"
infamy - evil fame or public reputation
dishonor, dishonour - a state of shame or disgrace; "he was resigned to a life of dishonor"
reputation, repute - the state of being held in high esteem and honor
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

disrepute

noun discredit, shame, disgrace, unpopularity, ignominy, dishonour, infamy, disfavour, ill repute, obloquy, ill favour, disesteem Our profession was brought into disrepute.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

disrepute

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
رَداءَةُ السُّمْعَه، سُمْعَه سَيِّئَه
ostudašpatná pověst
miskreditvanry
óorî, vansæmd
aptrintasnusidėvėjęsturintis blogą vardą
negodsslikta slava
zlá povesť
adını lekeleme

disrepute

[ˈdɪsrɪˈpjuːt] N to bring into disreputedesprestigiar
to fall into disreputedesprestigiarse
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

disrepute

[ˌdɪsrɪˈpjuːt] ndéshonneur m, discrédit m
to be in disrepute → être en discrédit
to bring sth into disrepute → faire tomber qch dans le discrédit, jeter le discrédit sur qch
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

disrepute

nschlechter Ruf; to bring something into disreputeetw in Verruf bringen; to fall into disreputein Verruf kommen or geraten
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

disrepute

[ˈdɪsrɪˈpjuːt] n to bring into disreputerovinare la reputazione di
to fall into disrepute → rovinarsi la reputazione
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

disrepute

(disrəˈpjuːt) noun
bad reputation. He has brought the family into disrepute.
disˈreputable (-ˈrepju-) adjective
1. not respectable, especially in appearance. a disreputable old coat.
2. of bad reputation. He's rather a disreputable character.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
(Such names are given in the western "settlements" only to elderly persons who are not esteemed; to the general disrepute of social unworth is affixed the special reproach of age.) A peddler came to his house and none went away--that is all that anybody knew.
It was only the next day that I discovered the reason we were thus neglected; for, to own the truth, something had occurred which suddenly brought "three-figure," and even "two-figure" people of our class into temporary disrepute. I shall explain that reason at the proper moment.
Fraser, the tutor, died however, and the school which had begun well sank from disrepute into infamy.
And when ye come to marriageable years, Where's the bold wooers who will jeopardize To take unto himself such disrepute As to my children's children still must cling, For what of infamy is lacking here?
Thus it was that to his host of passive enemies, Tarzan of the Apes added that day two active foes, both of whom remained awake long into the night planning means of revenge upon the white devil-god who had brought them into ridicule and disrepute, but with their most malevolent schemings was mingled a vein of real fear and awe that would not down.
Stiggins did not desire his hearers to be upon their guard against those false prophets and wretched mockers of religion, who, without sense to expound its first doctrines, or hearts to feel its first principles, are more dangerous members of society than the common criminal; imposing, as they necessarily do, upon the weakest and worst informed, casting scorn and contempt on what should be held most sacred, and bringing into partial disrepute large bodies of virtuous and well-conducted persons of many excellent sects and persuasions.
The two clerks, by dint of quarrelling over the details of their lives, and washing much of their dirty linen at the office, had obtained the disrepute which they merited.
``This is clearly bringing the game into disrepute and we trust Rugby League authorities will look into his behaviour appropriately.''
The National Lottery has been 'brought into disrepute' by the award of grants to anti-deportation campaigners, a Midland MP told Parliament yesterday.
Flintoff is England's greatest all-rounder - he's there for all rounds - but he's not so much bringing cricket into disrepute as disrepute into disrepute.
Hughes' team sought clarification about a disrepute charge but the beaks were unable to provide it.
THE ousted Miss Great Britain has denied "bringing the pageant into disrepute" by failing to declare her relationship with one of its judges.