disseat

dis·seat

 (dĭs-sēt′)
tr.v. dis·seat·ed, dis·seat·ing, dis·seats Archaic
To unseat.

disseat

(dɪsˈsiːt)
vb (tr)
to remove from a seat; to unseat
References in periodicals archive ?
In the fourth case, Johnson shares Edwards's resistance to Warburton's attempt to substitute "disseat" for "defeat" on the grounds that the latter word can be understood to mean simply "undo" or "change." But as Sherbo argues, Johnson did not mention this definition in his Dictionary (1755) and so must have taken it from the Canons.