dissect

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dis·sect

 (dĭ-sĕkt′, dī-, dī′sĕkt′)
tr.v. dis·sect·ed, dis·sect·ing, dis·sects
1. To cut apart or separate (tissue), especially for anatomical study.
2. To examine, analyze, or criticize in minute detail: dissected the plan afterward to learn why it had failed.

[Latin dissecāre, dissect-, to cut apart : dis-, dis- + secāre, to cut up; see sek- in Indo-European roots.]

dis·sec′ti·ble adj.
dis·sec′tor n.

dissect

(dɪˈsɛkt; daɪ-)
vb
1. (Zoology) to cut open and examine the structure of (a dead animal or plant)
2. (tr) to examine critically and minutely
[C17: from Latin dissecāre, from dis-1 + secāre to cut]
disˈsectible adj
disˈsection n
disˈsector n

dis•sect

(dɪˈsɛkt, daɪ-)

v.t.
1. to cut apart (an animal body, plant, etc.) to examine the structure and relation of parts.
2. to examine minutely; analyze.
[1600–10; < Latin dissectus, past participle of dissecāre to cut in pieces =dis- dis-1 + secāre to cut]
dis•sec′ti•ble, adj.
dis•sec′tor, n.

dis·sect

(dĭ-sĕkt′, dī′sĕkt′)
To cut apart or separate body tissues or parts for study.

dissect


Past participle: dissected
Gerund: dissecting

Imperative
dissect
dissect
Present
I dissect
you dissect
he/she/it dissects
we dissect
you dissect
they dissect
Preterite
I dissected
you dissected
he/she/it dissected
we dissected
you dissected
they dissected
Present Continuous
I am dissecting
you are dissecting
he/she/it is dissecting
we are dissecting
you are dissecting
they are dissecting
Present Perfect
I have dissected
you have dissected
he/she/it has dissected
we have dissected
you have dissected
they have dissected
Past Continuous
I was dissecting
you were dissecting
he/she/it was dissecting
we were dissecting
you were dissecting
they were dissecting
Past Perfect
I had dissected
you had dissected
he/she/it had dissected
we had dissected
you had dissected
they had dissected
Future
I will dissect
you will dissect
he/she/it will dissect
we will dissect
you will dissect
they will dissect
Future Perfect
I will have dissected
you will have dissected
he/she/it will have dissected
we will have dissected
you will have dissected
they will have dissected
Future Continuous
I will be dissecting
you will be dissecting
he/she/it will be dissecting
we will be dissecting
you will be dissecting
they will be dissecting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been dissecting
you have been dissecting
he/she/it has been dissecting
we have been dissecting
you have been dissecting
they have been dissecting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been dissecting
you will have been dissecting
he/she/it will have been dissecting
we will have been dissecting
you will have been dissecting
they will have been dissecting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been dissecting
you had been dissecting
he/she/it had been dissecting
we had been dissecting
you had been dissecting
they had been dissecting
Conditional
I would dissect
you would dissect
he/she/it would dissect
we would dissect
you would dissect
they would dissect
Past Conditional
I would have dissected
you would have dissected
he/she/it would have dissected
we would have dissected
you would have dissected
they would have dissected
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.dissect - cut open or cut apart; "dissect the bodies for analysis"
vivisect - cut (a body) open while still alive; "people no longer vivisect animals--it's considered unethical"
anatomise, anatomize - dissect in order to analyze; "anatomize the bodies of the victims of this strange disease"
cut - separate with or as if with an instrument; "Cut the rope"
2.dissect - make a mathematical, chemical, or grammatical analysis ofdissect - make a mathematical, chemical, or grammatical analysis of; break down into components or essential features; "analyze a specimen"; "analyze a sentence"; "analyze a chemical compound"
parse - analyze syntactically by assigning a constituent structure to (a sentence)
botanise, botanize - collect and study plants

dissect

verb
1. cut up or apart, dismember, lay open, anatomize We dissected a frog in biology.
2. analyse, study, investigate, research, explore, break down, inspect, scrutinize People want to dissect his work.

dissect

verb
To separate into parts for study:
Translations
يُشَرِّحُ جُثَّه
pitvat
dissekere
felboncol
kryfja
perpjautiskrosti
preparētsīki analizēt
przeprowadzić sekcję
pitvať
kesmekparçalamak

dissect

[dɪˈsekt] VT [+ animal] → disecar (fig) → analizar minuciosamente

dissect

[dɪˈsɛkt daɪˈsɛkt] vt
(lit) [+ animal, corpse] → disséquer
(fig) [+ theory, situation, issue] → disséquer; [+ account, book, report, article] → éplucher

dissect

vt plantpräparieren; animalsezieren, präparieren; (fig) report, theorysezieren, zergliedern

dissect

[dɪˈsɛkt] vt (animal, body, specimen) → sezionare (fig) → sviscerare

dissect

(diˈsekt) verb
to cut (eg an animal's body) into parts for (scientific) examination.
disˈsection (-ʃən) noun

dis·sect

v. disecar, acto de dividir y cortar; hacer una disección.
References in classic literature ?
He had no time for dissections, but he knew that he thought of the bullets only as things that could prevent him from reaching the place of his endeavor.
The internal anatomy, I may remark here, as dissection has since shown, was almost equally simple.
The unhappiness of Philip's life at school had called up in him the power of self-analysis; and this vice, as subtle as drug-taking, had taken possession of him so that he had now a peculiar keenness in the dissection of his feelings.
In South America, a burrowing rodent, the tuco-tuco, or Ctenomys, is even more subterranean in its habits than the mole; and I was assured by a Spaniard, who had often caught them, that they were frequently blind; one which I kept alive was certainly in this condition, the cause, as appeared on dissection, having been inflammation of the nictitating membrane.
Mysterious as this circumstance appears to be, it is not more surprising than that the body of one's fellow-creature, directly after death, and before putrefaction has commenced, should often be of so deleterious a quality, that the mere puncture from an instrument used in its dissection, should prove fatal.
The observer stood with her hand upon her own bosom, looking at the girl, as one afflicted with a diseased part might curiously watch the dissection and exposition of an analogous case.
Here's a wenerable old lady a--lyin' on the carpet waitin' for dissection, or galwinism, or some other rewivin' and scientific inwention.'
Now, by the above dissection, the reader will see that in Germany a man may THINK he is a man, but when he comes to look into the matter closely, he is bound to have his doubts; he finds that in sober truth he is a most ridiculous mixture; and if he ends by trying to comfort himself with the thought that he can at least depend on a third of this mess as being manly and masculine, the humiliating second thought will quickly remind him that in this respect he is no better off than any woman or cow in the land.
As no trace of an opening could be found, Doctor Ponnonner was preparing his instruments for dissection, when I observed that it was then past two o'clock.
Almost surreptitiously she slipped a clean sheet in front of her, and her hand, descending, began drawing square boxes halved and quartered by straight lines, and then circles which underwent the same process of dissection.
Digital subtraction angiography has traditionally been considered the diagnostic gold standard, as subtle dissections can still sometimes be missed on high-resolution, non-invasive vascular imaging studies.
Simulation-based education with hands-on courses and cadaveric dissections focus on a detailed practice of surgical procedures prior to live patient operations, consequently an increase in confidence levels and surgical skills of residents will be noticed (6).