dissect

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dis·sect

 (dĭ-sĕkt′, dī-, dī′sĕkt′)
tr.v. dis·sect·ed, dis·sect·ing, dis·sects
1. To cut apart or separate (tissue), especially for anatomical study.
2. To examine, analyze, or criticize in minute detail: dissected the plan afterward to learn why it had failed.

[Latin dissecāre, dissect-, to cut apart : dis-, dis- + secāre, to cut up; see sek- in Indo-European roots.]

dis·sec′ti·ble adj.
dis·sec′tor n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dissect

(dɪˈsɛkt; daɪ-)
vb
1. (Zoology) to cut open and examine the structure of (a dead animal or plant)
2. (tr) to examine critically and minutely
[C17: from Latin dissecāre, from dis-1 + secāre to cut]
disˈsectible adj
disˈsection n
disˈsector n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

dis•sect

(dɪˈsɛkt, daɪ-)

v.t.
1. to cut apart (an animal body, plant, etc.) to examine the structure and relation of parts.
2. to examine minutely; analyze.
[1600–10; < Latin dissectus, past participle of dissecāre to cut in pieces =dis- dis-1 + secāre to cut]
dis•sec′ti•ble, adj.
dis•sec′tor, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

dis·sect

(dĭ-sĕkt′, dī′sĕkt′)
To cut apart or separate body tissues or parts for study.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dissect


Past participle: dissected
Gerund: dissecting

Imperative
dissect
dissect
Present
I dissect
you dissect
he/she/it dissects
we dissect
you dissect
they dissect
Preterite
I dissected
you dissected
he/she/it dissected
we dissected
you dissected
they dissected
Present Continuous
I am dissecting
you are dissecting
he/she/it is dissecting
we are dissecting
you are dissecting
they are dissecting
Present Perfect
I have dissected
you have dissected
he/she/it has dissected
we have dissected
you have dissected
they have dissected
Past Continuous
I was dissecting
you were dissecting
he/she/it was dissecting
we were dissecting
you were dissecting
they were dissecting
Past Perfect
I had dissected
you had dissected
he/she/it had dissected
we had dissected
you had dissected
they had dissected
Future
I will dissect
you will dissect
he/she/it will dissect
we will dissect
you will dissect
they will dissect
Future Perfect
I will have dissected
you will have dissected
he/she/it will have dissected
we will have dissected
you will have dissected
they will have dissected
Future Continuous
I will be dissecting
you will be dissecting
he/she/it will be dissecting
we will be dissecting
you will be dissecting
they will be dissecting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been dissecting
you have been dissecting
he/she/it has been dissecting
we have been dissecting
you have been dissecting
they have been dissecting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been dissecting
you will have been dissecting
he/she/it will have been dissecting
we will have been dissecting
you will have been dissecting
they will have been dissecting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been dissecting
you had been dissecting
he/she/it had been dissecting
we had been dissecting
you had been dissecting
they had been dissecting
Conditional
I would dissect
you would dissect
he/she/it would dissect
we would dissect
you would dissect
they would dissect
Past Conditional
I would have dissected
you would have dissected
he/she/it would have dissected
we would have dissected
you would have dissected
they would have dissected
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.dissect - cut open or cut apart; "dissect the bodies for analysis"
vivisect - cut (a body) open while still alive; "people no longer vivisect animals--it's considered unethical"
anatomise, anatomize - dissect in order to analyze; "anatomize the bodies of the victims of this strange disease"
cut - separate with or as if with an instrument; "Cut the rope"
2.dissect - make a mathematical, chemical, or grammatical analysis ofdissect - make a mathematical, chemical, or grammatical analysis of; break down into components or essential features; "analyze a specimen"; "analyze a sentence"; "analyze a chemical compound"
parse - analyze syntactically by assigning a constituent structure to (a sentence)
botanise, botanize - collect and study plants
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

dissect

verb
1. cut up or apart, dismember, lay open, anatomize We dissected a frog in biology.
2. analyse, study, investigate, research, explore, break down, inspect, scrutinize People want to dissect his work.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

dissect

verb
To separate into parts for study:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
يُشَرِّحُ جُثَّه
pitvat
dissekere
felboncol
kryfja
perpjautiskrosti
preparētsīki analizēt
przeprowadzić sekcję
pitvať
kesmekparçalamak

dissect

[dɪˈsekt] VT [+ animal] → disecar (fig) → analizar minuciosamente
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

dissect

[dɪˈsɛkt daɪˈsɛkt] vt
(lit) [+ animal, corpse] → disséquer
(fig) [+ theory, situation, issue] → disséquer; [+ account, book, report, article] → éplucher
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

dissect

vt plantpräparieren; animalsezieren, präparieren; (fig) report, theorysezieren, zergliedern
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

dissect

[dɪˈsɛkt] vt (animal, body, specimen) → sezionare (fig) → sviscerare
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

dissect

(diˈsekt) verb
to cut (eg an animal's body) into parts for (scientific) examination.
disˈsection (-ʃən) noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

dis·sect

v. disecar, acto de dividir y cortar; hacer una disección.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
"You'll have to arrange about a part to dissect," the secretary told him.
He dissected beauty in his crowded little bedroom laboratory, where cooking smells alternated with the outer bedlam of the Silva tribe; and, having dissected and learned the anatomy of beauty, he was nearer being able to create beauty itself.
The body of the unfortunate girl was duly dissected, and no one remarked or appeared to recognise her.
And Sophia, herself, after some little consideration, began to dissect the fowl, which she found to be as full of eggs as George had reported it.
Dissect him how I may, then, I but go skin deep; I know him not, and never will.
They were the first I had ever beheld, and I should have been curious enough to dissect one of them, if I had had proper instruments, which I unluckily left behind me in the ship, although, indeed, the sight was so nauseous, that it perfectly turned my stomach.
No little Gradgrind had ever known wonder on the subject, each little Gradgrind having at five years old dissected the Great Bear like a Professor Owen, and driven Charles's Wain like a locomotive engine-driver.
Having carefully dissected several specimens of these workers, I can affirm that the eyes are far more rudimentary in the smaller workers than can be accounted for merely by their proportionally lesser size; and I fully believe, though I dare not assert so positively, that the workers of intermediate size have their ocelli in an exactly intermediate condition.
Petersburg and the neighboring villages was dissected, plank by plank, and its foundations dug up and ran- sacked for hidden treasure -- and not by boys, but men -- pretty grave, unromantic men, too, some of them.
But when we come to dissect it with attention, it will appear to be made up of nothing but fair-sounding words.
Human sciences dissect everything to comprehend it, and kill everything to examine it.
He might dissect, anatomize, and give names; but, not to speak of a final cause, causes in their secondary and tertiary grades were utterly unknown to him.