dissent

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dis·sent

 (dĭ-sĕnt′)
intr.v. dis·sent·ed, dis·sent·ing, dis·sents
1. To have or express an opinion different from a prevailing or official position; disagree.
2. Law To reach a conclusion contrary to the majority of the judges deciding a case; render a minority opinion.
n.
1. Difference of opinion or feeling; disagreement.
2. The refusal to conform to the authority or doctrine of an established church; nonconformity.
3. Law A judicial opinion reaching a conclusion contrary to that reached by the majority of judges deciding a case; a minority opinion. Also called dissenting opinion.

[Middle English dissenten, from Latin dissentīre : dis-, dis- + sentīre, to feel; see sent- in Indo-European roots.]

dis·sent′ing·ly adv.

dissent

(dɪˈsɛnt)
vb (intr)
1. to have a disagreement or withhold assent
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) Christianity to refuse to conform to the doctrines, beliefs, or practices of an established church, and to adhere to a different system of beliefs and practices
n
3. a difference of opinion
4. (Ecclesiastical Terms) Christianity separation from an established church; Nonconformism
5. (Law) the voicing of a minority opinion in announcing the decision on a case at law; dissenting judgment
[C16: from Latin dissentīre to disagree, from dis-1 + sentīre to perceive, feel]
disˈsenter n
disˈsenting adj
disˈsentingly adv

dis•sent

(dɪˈsɛnt)

v.i.
1. to differ in sentiment or opinion, esp. from the majority (often fol. by from).
2. to reject the doctrines or authority of an established church.
n.
3. difference of sentiment or opinion.
4. separation from an established church, esp. the Church of England; nonconformity.
[1400–50; late Middle English (< Middle French dissentir) < Latin dissentīre=dis- dis-1 + sentīre to feel]
dis•sent′ing•ly, adv.

dissent


Past participle: dissented
Gerund: dissenting

Imperative
dissent
dissent
Present
I dissent
you dissent
he/she/it dissents
we dissent
you dissent
they dissent
Preterite
I dissented
you dissented
he/she/it dissented
we dissented
you dissented
they dissented
Present Continuous
I am dissenting
you are dissenting
he/she/it is dissenting
we are dissenting
you are dissenting
they are dissenting
Present Perfect
I have dissented
you have dissented
he/she/it has dissented
we have dissented
you have dissented
they have dissented
Past Continuous
I was dissenting
you were dissenting
he/she/it was dissenting
we were dissenting
you were dissenting
they were dissenting
Past Perfect
I had dissented
you had dissented
he/she/it had dissented
we had dissented
you had dissented
they had dissented
Future
I will dissent
you will dissent
he/she/it will dissent
we will dissent
you will dissent
they will dissent
Future Perfect
I will have dissented
you will have dissented
he/she/it will have dissented
we will have dissented
you will have dissented
they will have dissented
Future Continuous
I will be dissenting
you will be dissenting
he/she/it will be dissenting
we will be dissenting
you will be dissenting
they will be dissenting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been dissenting
you have been dissenting
he/she/it has been dissenting
we have been dissenting
you have been dissenting
they have been dissenting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been dissenting
you will have been dissenting
he/she/it will have been dissenting
we will have been dissenting
you will have been dissenting
they will have been dissenting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been dissenting
you had been dissenting
he/she/it had been dissenting
we had been dissenting
you had been dissenting
they had been dissenting
Conditional
I would dissent
you would dissent
he/she/it would dissent
we would dissent
you would dissent
they would dissent
Past Conditional
I would have dissented
you would have dissented
he/she/it would have dissented
we would have dissented
you would have dissented
they would have dissented
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dissent - (law) the difference of one judge's opinion from that of the majority; "he expressed his dissent in a contrary opinion"
objection - the speech act of objecting
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
2.dissent - a difference of opinion
disagreement - the speech act of disagreeing or arguing or disputing
3.dissent - the act of protesting; a public (often organized) manifestation of dissent
boycott - a group's refusal to have commercial dealings with some organization in protest against its policies
direct action - a protest action by labor or minority groups to obtain their demands
resistance - group action in opposition to those in power
demonstration, manifestation - a public display of group feelings (usually of a political nature); "there were violent demonstrations against the war"
walkout - the act of walking out (of a meeting or organization) as a sign of protest; "there was a walkout by the Black members as the chairman rose to speak"
Verb1.dissent - withhold assent; "Several Republicans dissented"
disagree, take issue, differ, dissent - be of different opinions; "I beg to differ!"; "She disagrees with her husband on many questions"
acquiesce, assent, accede - to agree or express agreement; "The Maestro assented to the request for an encore"
2.dissent - express opposition through action or words; "dissent to the laws of the country"
controvert, contradict, oppose - be resistant to; "The board opposed his motion"
walk out, strike - stop work in order to press demands; "The auto workers are striking for higher wages"; "The employees walked out when their demand for better benefits was not met"
demonstrate, march - march in protest; take part in a demonstration; "Thousands demonstrated against globalization during the meeting of the most powerful economic nations in Seattle"
rebel, rise up, arise, rise - take part in a rebellion; renounce a former allegiance
renegade, rebel - break with established customs
3.dissent - be of different opinions; "I beg to differ!"; "She disagrees with her husband on many questions"
dissent - withhold assent; "Several Republicans dissented"
clash - disagree violently; "We clashed over the new farm policies"
contradict, contravene, negate - deny the truth of

dissent

verb
1. disagree, object, disapprove, demur, express disagreement, express objection Just one of the 10 members dissented.
disagree accept, agree, assent
dissent from something disagree with, challenge, dispute, object to, protest against, argue with, refuse to accept, take issue with, quibble with No one dissents from the decision to unify.

dissent

verb
To be of different opinion:
Idiom: join issue.
noun
Translations
إخْتِلاف، إنْشِقاقيُعارِض، يَخْتَلِف مع، لا يَتَّفِق مع
nesouhlasnesouhlasit
afvige frauenighed
más véleményen van
skoîanamunur, ósamkomulagvera ósammála
domstarpībasnepiekristnevienprātība
anlaşmazlıkgörüş ayrılığıkarşı görüşte olmak

dissent

[dɪˈsent]
A. Ndisentimiento m, disconformidad f (Rel, Pol) → disidencia f
B. VIdisentir (from de) → estar disconforme (from con) (Rel) → disidir

dissent

[dɪˈsɛnt]
ndissentiment m, contestation f
voices of dissent → des voix contestataires
dissent from sth → contestation de qch
vicontester
to dissent from sth → contester qch

dissent

vi
(= oppose)anderer Meinung sein, differieren (geh); I strongly dissent from what he saysich muss dem, was er sagt, entschieden widersprechen
(Eccl) → sich weigern, die Staatskirche anzuerkennen
n
(= opposition)Dissens m (geh), → Nichtübereinstimmung f; to voice/express one’s dissent (with something)erklären, dass man (mit etw) nicht übereinstimmt; there was remarkably little dissentes gab bemerkenswert wenig Widerspruch
(Eccl) → Weigerung fdie (englische) Staatskirche anzuerkennen

dissent

[dɪˈsɛnt]
1. ndissenso
2. vi (gen) to dissent (from)dissentire (da)

dissent

(diˈsent) noun
disagreement. There was a murmur of dissent.
verb
(with from) to disagree. I dissent from the general opinion.
disˈsension (-ʃən) noun
disagreement. The proposal caused a great deal of dissension.
References in classic literature ?
He gave no orders, but only assented to or dissented from what others suggested.
It focuses on those who, from colonial days to the present, dissented against the ruling paradigm of their time: from the Puritan Anne Hutchinson and Native American chief Powhatan in the seventeenth century, to the Occupy and Tea Party movements in the twenty-first century.
However, since 2008, a few members have dissented at nearly every meeting during their annual terms as voting members of the Committee.
113) In the Supreme Court of Canada's first decision--Kelly v Sulivan, [1876] 1 SCR 3, cited in L'Heureux-Dube, supra note 7 at 499--each judge delivered a separate opinion, including Taschereau J who dissented.
Sasi presents dozens of men and women who are in jail with fabricated cases just because they dissented or the state felt that they are dissenters: Maudani, Binayak Sen, Soni Sori, Irom Sharmila, the list goes on endlessly.
26) Maurice Kelman defines "sustained dissent" as when a Justice, presented with a question decided by a prior case in which the Justice dissented, "cling[s] to his own doctrinal position" and renews his original dissent.
Justice Blackmun dissented in every significant capital case, and spoke out more sharply against the direction that the Court was taking.
This paper presents an empirical study of dissents at the Second Circuit Court of Appeals, with a focus on the one judge, Judge Pooler, who has dissented most in the time period studied.
5) He also furnished for his oral history a "List of Cases in which I Have Dissented Where the Supreme Court of the United States Has Agreed with My Dissent and Reversed the Supreme Court of California.
Remarkably, there were nine special opinions, seven of which concurred in part and dissented in part.
The thrust of his remarks were that in his opinion Catholic MPs who dissented from Catholic teaching in this matter would first have to go to confession, before receiving Communion.
Thomas, too, dissented from the majority in that case, on the ground that in his view anti-sodomy laws were not unconstitutional; but he also noted that the Texas law was "uncommonly silly" and deserved to be repealed.