disservice

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dis·ser·vice

 (dĭs-sûr′vĭs)
n.
A harmful action, especially one undertaken unknowingly or with good intentions.

disservice

(dɪsˈsɜːvɪs)
n
an ill turn; wrong; injury, esp when trying to help
disˈserviceable adj

dis•serv•ice

(dɪsˈsɜr vɪs)

n.
harmful or injurious service; an ill turn.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.disservice - an act intended to help that turns out badly; "he did them a disservice"
injury - an act that causes someone or something to receive physical damage
service - an act of help or assistance; "he did them a service"

disservice

noun wrong, injury, harm, injustice, disfavour, unkindness, bad turn, ill turn You could do yourself a grave disservice.
service, courtesy, kindness, indulgence, good turn, obligement (Scot. or archaic)

disservice

noun
An act that is not just:
Law: injury.
Translations
ضَرَر، أذى
špatná služba
bjørnetjeneste
rossz szolgálat
ógagn
meškos paslaugapakenkimas
slikts/lāča pakalpojums
zlá služba
zararlı davranış

disservice

[ˈdɪsˈsɜːvɪs] Nperjuicio m
to do sb a disserviceperjudicar a algn

disservice

[ˌdɪsˈsɜːrvɪs] n
to do sb a disservice → rendre un mauvais service à qn, desservir qn
to do sth a disservice → faire du tort à qch

disservice

n to do oneself/somebody a disservicesich/jdm einen schlechten Dienst erweisen

disservice

[ˈdɪsˈsɜːvɪs] n to do sb a disservicerendere un cattivo servizio a qn

disservice

(disˈsəːvis) noun
an action which is not helpful.
References in classic literature ?
Only, look here: shall you not be doing the General a great disservice, as well as, through him, a great disservice to yourself?
Believe me, my dear Miss Elizabeth, that your modesty, so far from doing you any disservice, rather adds to your other perfections.
But if we consider this matter in another point of view, it will appear to require great caution; for when the advantage proposed is trifling, as the accustoming the people easily to abolish their laws is of bad consequence, it is evidently better to pass over some faults which either the legislator or the magistrates may have committed; for the alterations will not be of so much service as a habit of disobeying the magistrates will be of disservice.