dissociative disorder


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dissociative disorder

n
(Psychology) psychol an emotional disorder characterized by fugue states or multiple personality
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dissociative disorder - dissociation so severe that the usually integrated functions of consciousness and perception of self break down
folie, mental disorder, mental disturbance, psychological disorder, disturbance - (psychiatry) a psychological disorder of thought or emotion; a more neutral term than mental illness
depersonalisation, depersonalisation disorder, depersonalisation neurosis, depersonalization, depersonalization disorder, depersonalization neurosis - emotional dissociative disorder in which there is loss of contact with your own personal reality accompanied by feelings of unreality and strangeness
fugue, psychogenic fugue - dissociative disorder in which a person forgets who they are and leaves home to creates a new life; during the fugue there is no memory of the former life; after recovering there is no memory for events during the dissociative state
multiple personality, split personality - a relatively rare dissociative disorder in which the usual integrity of the personality breaks down and two or more independent personalities emerge
disassociation, dissociation - a state in which some integrated part of a person's life becomes separated from the rest of the personality and functions independently
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
All the results of the study said that dissociative disorder are not caused by fantasy at all and are all responses to severe trauma.
Specifically, they found valproate more often prescribed for women with epilepsy who also had mood or anxiety and dissociative disorder, while topiramate was more often prescribed in women with headaches or migraines.
I thought you would be interested in a recent case that demonstrates the application of precision psychiatry in an adolescent patient previously diagnosed with an attention disorder, an anxiety disorder, and a possible dissociative disorder.
In ICD-10 dissociative (conversion) disorders include: dissociative amnesia, dissociative fugue, dissociative stupor, trance and possession disorder, and dissociative disorder of movement and sensation, subclassified in dissociative motor disorder, dissociative convulsions, dissociative anesthesia and sensory loss, mixed dissociative disorders and other dissociative disorders (Ganser's syndrome, multiple personality disorder, transient dissociative disorders) (3).
Along with dissociative disorder and somatisation disorder, conversion disorder has been recognised for almost 4,000 years under the rubric of "Hysteria," a term that disappeared in 1980 when DSM and International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD) defined three distinct illnesses [3].
Living with a dissociative disorder can be very distressing but there is help available.
The objectives of the study were to investigate the sociodemographic features, co-morbid anxiety and depression and family functioning in patients admitted with dissociative disorder to a tertiary care hospital.
Former college/professional football star Herschel Walker, for example, had a dissociative disorder and exhibited multiple personalities after retiring from his sport.
A two-year follow-up study in the city of Sivas, Turkey, demonstrated that prior to the DSM-IV, dissociative disorder, that is, an overt "psychological" dissociative condition, was present in 47.4% of CD patients (9).
Moreover, siblings of patients with bipolar disorder were not only at 8.4-fold increased risk of subsequent hospitalization for that disease, they also were at 4.2-fold greater risk than controls for schizophrenia and 7.6-fold increased risk for hospitalization for other psychiatric disorders, a grab-bag category that included anxiety disorders, dissociative disorder, post traumatic stress disorder, eating disorders, pervasive developmental disorders, and personality disorders, according to Dr.
Key Words: Conversion Disorder, Dissociative Disorder, Anxiety symptoms, Co-morbidity.

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