dissolute


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dis·so·lute

 (dĭs′ə-lo͞ot′)
adj.
Lacking moral restraint; indulging in sensual pleasures or vices.

[Middle English, from Latin dissolūtus, past participle of dissolvere, to dissolve; see dissolve.]

dis′so·lute′ly adv.
dis′so·lute′ness n.

dissolute

(ˈdɪsəˌluːt)
adj
given to dissipation; debauched
[C14: from Latin dissolūtus loose, from dissolvere to dissolve]
ˈdissoˌlutely adv
ˈdissoˌluteness n

dis•so•lute

(ˈdɪs əˌlut)

adj.
indifferent to moral restraints; given to improper conduct.
[1350–1400; Middle English (< Anglo-French) < Latin dissolūtus, past participle of dissolvere to dissolve]
dis′so•lute`ly, adv.
dis′so•lute`ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.dissolute - unrestrained by convention or morality; "Congreve draws a debauched aristocratic society"; "deplorably dissipated and degraded"; "riotous living"; "fast women"
immoral - deliberately violating accepted principles of right and wrong

dissolute

dissolute

adjective
Translations
خَليع، فاجِر، فاسِد
prostopášnýzhýralý
fordærvet
léha
ósiîsamur; svallsamur; lauslátur
pasileidimas
izlaidīgsizvirtis
ahlâksız

dissolute

[ˈdɪsəluːt] ADJdisoluto

dissolute

[ˈdɪsəluːt] adj (= debauched) [person] → débauché(e), dissolu(e); [behaviour, lifestyle] → dissolu(e)

dissolute

adj personzügellos; way of lifeausschweifend, zügellos; appearanceverlebt

dissolute

[ˈdɪsəˌluːt] adjdissoluto/a

dissolute

(ˈdisəluːt) adjective
bad or immoral. dissolute behaviour.
ˈdissoluteness noun
References in classic literature ?
Beauty is as summer fruits,) which are easy to corrupt, and cannot last; and for the most part it makes a dissolute youth, and an age a little out of countenance; but yet certainly again, if it light well, it maketh virtue shine, and vices blush.
Yes, he also declared that he greatly liked me for my purity and good sense; that I must beware of dissolute young men; and that he knew Anna Thedorovna, who had charged him to inform me that she would shortly be visiting me in person.
Not only did his contempories, carried away by their passions, talk in this way, but posterity and history have acclaimed Napoleon as grand, while Kutuzov is described by foreigners as a crafty, dissolute, weak old courtier, and by Russians as something indefinite- a sort of puppet useful only because he had a Russian name.
At any rate you know me as a dissolute dog, who has never done any good, and never will.
In his youth he had been a dissolute libertine, but was converted by Mother Ann herself, and had partaken of the wild fanaticism of the early Shakers.
There he has lived ever since, growing older and sinking lower, often near fortune but always missing it, a slave to bad habits, weak and dissolute if you like, but ever keeping up his voluntary sacrifice, ever with that unconquerable longing for one last glimpse of his own country and his own people.
And when his other lusts, amid clouds of incense and perfumes and garlands and wines, and all the pleasures of a dissolute life, now let loose, come buzzing around him, nourishing to the utmost the sting of desire which they implant in his drone-like nature, then at last this lord of the soul, having Madness for the captain of his guard, breaks out into a frenzy: and if he finds in himself any good opinions or appetites in process of formation, and there is in him any sense of shame remaining, to these better principles he puts an end, and casts them forth until he has purged away temperance and brought in madness to the full.
About this time the father of our Chrysostom died, and he was left heir to a large amount of property in chattels as well as in land, no small number of cattle and sheep, and a large sum of money, of all of which the young man was left dissolute owner, and indeed he was deserving of it all, for he was a very good comrade, and kind-hearted, and a friend of worthy folk, and had a countenance like a benediction.
Alexander Vronsky, in spite of the dissolute life, and in especial the drunken habits, for which he was notorious, was quite one of the court circle.
Judge, jury and spectators have visions of his lounging about, with an ill-looking, large-whiskered, dissolute young fellow of six feet high.
Dimmesdale longed at least to shake hands with the tarry black-guard, and recreate himself with a few improper jests, such as dissolute sailors so abound with, and a volley of good, round, solid, satisfactory, and heaven-defying oaths
how many ears are turned to the tales which dissolute crusaders, or hypocritical pilgrims, bring from that fatal land