distaste

(redirected from distastes)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

dis·taste

 (dĭs-tāst′)
n.
Dislike or aversion.
tr.v. dis·tast·ed, dis·tast·ing, dis·tastes Archaic
1. To feel repugnance for; dislike.
2. To offend; displease.

distaste

(dɪsˈteɪst)
n
(often foll by for) an absence of pleasure (in); dislike (of); aversion (to): to look at someone with distaste.
vb
(tr) an archaic word for dislike

dis•taste

(dɪsˈteɪst)

n., v. -tast•ed, -tast•ing. n.
1. dislike; disinclination: a distaste for household chores.
2. dislike for food or drink.
v.t.
3. Archaic. to dislike.
[1580–90]

distaste


Past participle: distasted
Gerund: distasting

Imperative
distaste
distaste
Present
I distaste
you distaste
he/she/it distastes
we distaste
you distaste
they distaste
Preterite
I distasted
you distasted
he/she/it distasted
we distasted
you distasted
they distasted
Present Continuous
I am distasting
you are distasting
he/she/it is distasting
we are distasting
you are distasting
they are distasting
Present Perfect
I have distasted
you have distasted
he/she/it has distasted
we have distasted
you have distasted
they have distasted
Past Continuous
I was distasting
you were distasting
he/she/it was distasting
we were distasting
you were distasting
they were distasting
Past Perfect
I had distasted
you had distasted
he/she/it had distasted
we had distasted
you had distasted
they had distasted
Future
I will distaste
you will distaste
he/she/it will distaste
we will distaste
you will distaste
they will distaste
Future Perfect
I will have distasted
you will have distasted
he/she/it will have distasted
we will have distasted
you will have distasted
they will have distasted
Future Continuous
I will be distasting
you will be distasting
he/she/it will be distasting
we will be distasting
you will be distasting
they will be distasting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been distasting
you have been distasting
he/she/it has been distasting
we have been distasting
you have been distasting
they have been distasting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been distasting
you will have been distasting
he/she/it will have been distasting
we will have been distasting
you will have been distasting
they will have been distasting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been distasting
you had been distasting
he/she/it had been distasting
we had been distasting
you had been distasting
they had been distasting
Conditional
I would distaste
you would distaste
he/she/it would distaste
we would distaste
you would distaste
they would distaste
Past Conditional
I would have distasted
you would have distasted
he/she/it would have distasted
we would have distasted
you would have distasted
they would have distasted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.distaste - a feeling of intense dislikedistaste - a feeling of intense dislike  
dislike - a feeling of aversion or antipathy; "my dislike of him was instinctive"

distaste

distaste

noun
An attitude or feeling of aversion:
verb
Archaic. To have a feeling of aversion for:
Translations
كُره، نُفور، إشْمِئْزاز
nechuťodpor
modviljeubehag
ógeî, ímugustur
koktumaskoktuspasidygėjimas
nepatikariebums
hoşlanmamasevmeme

distaste

[ˈdɪsˈteɪst] Naversión f (for por, a) she looked at his grubby clothes with distastemiró su ropa mugrienta con expresión de repugnancia

distaste

[dɪsˈteɪst] n (= dislike) → désapprobation m; (stronger)dégoût m
distaste for sth/sb → désapprobation pour qch/qn; (stronger)dégoût de qch/qn, dégoût pour qch/qn
with distaste → avec désapprobation; (stronger)avec dégoût

distaste

nWiderwille m(for gegen)

distaste

[ˈdɪsˈteɪst] n distaste (for)ripugnanza (per)

distaste

(disˈteist) noun
dislike (of something unpleasant). She looked at the untidy room with distaste.
disˈtasteful adjective
disagreeable. a distasteful job.
disˈtastefully adverb
disˈtastefulness noun

distaste

n. aversión, disgusto.
References in classic literature ?
Prosperity is not without many fears and distastes; and adversity is not without comforts and hopes.
There was a real distaste in his face, and yet it was the face of a coarse and sensual man.
It seemed to him this evening as if the cruelty of his outburst to Rosamond had made an obligation for him, and he dreaded the obligation: he dreaded Lydgate's unsuspecting good-will: he dreaded his own distaste for his spoiled life, which would leave him in motiveless levity.
Wordsworth made the country, but Lamb made the town; and there is quite a band of poets nowadays who share his distaste for mountains, and take London for their muse.
I am, perhaps, unduly sensitive, but I confess that the idea of being suddenly spilt into an infuriated ocean in the midst of darkness and uproar affected me always with a sensation of shrinking distaste. To be drowned in a pond, though it might be called an ignominious fate by the ignorant, is yet a bright and peaceful ending in comparison with some other endings to one's earthly career which I have mentally quaked at in the intervals or even in the midst of violent exertions.