distorter


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dis·tort

 (dĭ-stôrt′)
tr.v. dis·tort·ed, dis·tort·ing, dis·torts
1. To twist out of a proper or natural relation of parts; misshape: a reflection distorted in the moving water; a face distorted in misery.
2. To cause to deviate from what is normal, reasonable, or accurate: "Though I knew how to translate exactly what she had told me, I realized that any translation would distort the deepest meaning of her message" (Richard Rodriguez).
3. Electronics To cause distortion in (a signal or waveform, for example).

[Latin distorquēre, distort- : dis-, apart; see dis- + torquēre, to twist; see terkw- in Indo-European roots.]

dis·tort′er n.
Synonyms: distort, twist, deform, contort, warp
These verbs mean to alter form or character, usually disadvantageously. To distort is to change the physical shape of something, as by torsion or exaggerating certain features, or to misconstrue the meaning of something: "The human understanding is like a false mirror, which, receiving rays irregularly, distorts and discolors the nature of things" (Francis Bacon).
Twist applies to distortion of form or meaning: He twisted his mouth in pain. She accused me of twisting her words. Deform refers to change that disfigures and often implies the loss of desirable qualities such as beauty: Erosion deforms the landscape. Contort implies violent change that produces unnatural or grotesque effects: "The body of the bird ... contorted suddenly. Its back arching; its head and tail straining to feel the touch of the other; its taloned feet grappling for a hold on a world that was gone" (Pete Dunne).
Warp can refer to turning from a flat or straight form or from a true course or direction: The floorboards warped over the years. His judgment is warped by prejudice.
References in periodicals archive ?
Shban highlighted that the repeated appearance of the President comes at a time when Syria continues to face an intensive war of disinformation that includes falsification and distortion of facts contrary to the role of media as a conveyor not a distorter of the truth.
The distorter of placement, the chafer of necks, the twister of thumbs, but above all, the displayer of the ballerina's legs.
Growth plans by the brewery include packaging its Anger, Dunegras, Closure, Distorter, Brother Benjamin and Retribution brands.
In brief, Pappe's association with "controversy" stems from, amongst other things, his much-debated claim that Palestine was "ethnically cleansed" (in part at least) in the war of 1948; his claim, unpopular in Israel, that "Zionism is far more dangerous to the Middle East than Islam"; and because he has been accused of being, simply, a politically-motivated distorter of the historical "truth" by rival scholars.
Higginson himself, known to us as the pompous editor, literary muck-up, distorter of genius, was actually hard at work the whole time on another issue.
Certain plants that are normally capable of producing both pollen and seed will occasionally develop "sex ratio distorter genes" causing organisms to produce only mitochondria carrying seed.
The imbalance favoring females happens because the sex-skewing gene, called Distorter on the X (Dox), is located on the X chromosome.
You are a kangaroo artist, a distorter and perverter of law and justice, who rousts and railroads innocent victims of crimes at the hands of convicted and professional perjurers.
Responding directly to the all-too-common modern Wesleyan view that Palmer's only real significance is as a distorter of John Wesley's thought and worse in the eyes of many Wesleyans a precursor of Pentecostalism, Leclerc (drawing on Irigaray's notion of mimesis) argues that Palmer's notion of entire devotion to God allowed her to subvert the male order and gave her, and the thousands of holiness women who followed her, the ability to define themselves and their roles in society.
To explore the possibility of suppressor or distorter effects (see Rosenberg, 1968), the original relationship was retested under both contingent conditions.
William Chambers, called 'Neoclassical' today, would not have recommended his pupils to study Bernini in 1774 if he had considered him a Baroque distorter of classical models.

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