distortion

(redirected from distortionary)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

dis·tor·tion

 (dĭ-stôr′shən)
n.
1.
a. The act or an instance of distorting.
b. The condition of being distorted.
2. A statement that twists fact; a misrepresentation.
3.
a. The alteration of the original form of a signal representing an image, a sound, a waveform, or other information.
b. A visible or audible effect of such an alteration, such as the warping of an image or noise in an audio recording.
4. Psychology The modification of unconscious impulses into forms acceptable by conscious or dreaming perception.

dis·tor′tion·al, dis·tor′tion·ar′y, dis·tor′tive adj.

distortion

(dɪˈstɔːʃən)
n
1. the act or an instance of distorting or the state of being distorted
2. something that is distorted
3. (General Physics) an aberration of a lens or optical system in which the magnification varies with the lateral distance from the axis
4. (Electronics) electronics
a. an undesired change in the shape of an electromagnetic wave or signal
b. the result of such a change in waveform, esp a loss of clarity in radio reception or sound reproduction
5. (Psychology) psychol a change in perception so that it does not correspond to reality
6. (Psychoanalysis) psychoanal the disguising of the meaning of unconscious thoughts so that they may appear in consciousness, e.g. in dreams
disˈtortional adj

dis•tor•tion

(dɪˈstɔr ʃən)

n.
1. an act or instance of distorting.
2. the state of being distorted.
3. anything distorted, as an image or electronic signal.
4. an aberration of a lens or system of lenses in which the magnification of the object varies with the lateral distance from the axis of the lens.
[1575–85; < Latin]
dis•tor′tion•al, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.distortion - a change for the worsedistortion - a change for the worse    
damage, impairment, harm - the occurrence of a change for the worse
warping, warp - a moral or mental distortion
2.distortion - a shape resulting from distortion
shape, form - the spatial arrangement of something as distinct from its substance; "geometry is the mathematical science of shape"
crookedness, torsion, tortuosity, tortuousness, contortion - a tortuous and twisted shape or position; "they built a tree house in the tortuosities of its boughs"; "the acrobat performed incredible contortions"
buckle, warp - a shape distorted by twisting or folding
gnarl, knot - something twisted and tight and swollen; "their muscles stood out in knots"; "the old man's fists were two great gnarls"; "his stomach was in knots"
3.distortion - an optical phenomenon resulting from the failure of a lens or mirror to produce a good imagedistortion - an optical phenomenon resulting from the failure of a lens or mirror to produce a good image
chromatic aberration - an optical aberration in which the image has colored fringes
optical phenomenon - a physical phenomenon related to or involving light
spherical aberration - an optical aberration resulting in a distorted image
4.distortion - a change (usually undesired) in the waveform of an acoustic or analog electrical signal; the difference between two measurements of a signal (as between the input and output signal); "heavy metal guitar players use vacuum tube amplifiers to produce extreme distortion"
acoustic phenomenon - a physical phenomenon associated with the production or transmission of sound
electrical phenomenon - a physical phenomenon involving electricity
amplitude distortion, nonlinear distortion - distortion that occurs when the output signal does not have a linear relation to the input signal
5.distortion - the act of distorting something so it seems to mean something it was not intended to mean
falsification, misrepresentation - a willful perversion of facts
6.distortion - the mistake of misrepresenting the facts
error, fault, mistake - a wrong action attributable to bad judgment or ignorance or inattention; "he made a bad mistake"; "she was quick to point out my errors"; "I could understand his English in spite of his grammatical faults"

distortion

noun
1. misrepresentation, bias, slant, perversion, falsification, colouring He accused reporters of wilful distortion.
2. deformity, bend, twist, warp, buckle, contortion, malformation, crookedness, twistedness the gargoyle-like distortion of her face
Translations
تَحْريف، تَشْويه
zkreslenídeformace
fordrejningforvanskningforvrængning
vääristäminenvääristelyvääristymävääristyminen
eltorzításmeghamisítás
aflögun
boz ma

distortion

[dɪsˈtɔːʃən] N [of shape] → deformación f; [of sound, image] → distorsión f (fig) → distorsión f; [of truth] → tergiversación f

distortion

[dɪˈstɔːrʃən] n
[truth, facts, statement, reality] → déformation f; [figures] → falsification f
[sound, shape] → distorsion f

distortion

nVerzerrung f (also Phys); (of truth, words)Verdrehung f; (of reality, history)verzerrte Darstellung; (of facts)verzerrte Darstellung, Verdrehung f; (of judgement)Trübung f, → Beeinträchtigung f

distortion

[dɪsˈtɔːʃn] n (gen) → distorsione f; (of truth) → alterazione f; (of facts) → travisamento (Tech) → deformazione f

distort

(diˈstoːt) verb
1. to make or become twisted out of shape. Her face was distorted with pain; Metal distorts under stress.
2. to make (sound) indistinct and unnatural. Her voice sounded distorted on the telephone.
diˈstortion (-ʃən) noun

dis·tor·tion

n. distorsión, deformación, desfiguración.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this way, the fiscal authority could minimize variations in distortionary income taxes over the business cycle.
Also recognizing the fact that there maybe some households which have no other alternative and fuel price hikes would be an unbearable burden, the government could implement a targeted subsidy to provide relief to vulnerable households which will not be as distortionary.
Given the assumptions of this model, policy reform is less likely to be effective in two opposite sets of circumstances: when constraints on political officeholders are so weak that any reform is likely to be undermined, and when the constraints are so strong that policy is not very distortionary initially.
The consensus appears to be that the two primary modes of financing--income taxation and seigniorage--are distortionary.
However, the benefits that lobbyists deliver are likely to be economically inefficient, wasteful and distortionary, in which case executive productivity is overstated.
Furthermore, government in its role as regulator and supervisor can produce the same distortionary consequences as might have existed in the old public managed system.
Treasury found that Chinese (economic) policies were highly distortionary and posed a risk to China's economy, its global trading partners, and to global economic growth.
In this article, we generalize the existing descriptive approach to multigeneration public project evaluation, taking into account distortionary taxes on capital income.
Interventions are costly because they generate a financial need in a fiscally constrained government that relies solely on distortionary taxes.
The administration plans to advance reforms in the next year to tackle key bottlenecks to investment and employment, including reducing the tax burden and distortionary taxes, deepening the country's shallow capital market, and improving labour market flexibility and formalization.
Reform entails closing distortionary loopholes and increasing the fairness of the tax code.
Summary: The shift from fiscal austerity to a more stimulative stance will reduce the need for extreme monetary policies, which almost surely have had distortionary effects not just on financial markets but also on the real economy.