distress

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dis·tress

 (dĭ-strĕs′)
tr.v. dis·tressed, dis·tress·ing, dis·tress·es
1. To cause strain, anxiety, or suffering to. See Synonyms at trouble.
2. To mar or otherwise treat (an object or fabric, for example) to give the appearance of an antique or of heavy prior use.
3. Archaic To constrain or overcome by harassment.
n.
1. Anxiety or mental suffering.
2.
a. Bodily dysfunction or discomfort caused by disease or injury: respiratory distress.
b. Physical deterioration, as of a highway, caused by hard use over time: pavement distress.
3.
a. The condition of being in need of immediate assistance: a motorist in distress.
b. Suffering caused by poverty: programs to relieve public distress.
4. Law The act of distraining or seizing goods to compel payment or other satisfaction for a debt or other duty owed; distraint.

[Middle English distressen, from Old French destresser, from destresse, constraint, from Vulgar Latin *districtia, from Latin districtus, past participle of distringere, to hinder; see distrain.]

dis·tress′ing·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

distress

(dɪˈstrɛs)
vb (tr)
1. (Psychology) to cause mental pain to; upset badly
2. (Social Welfare) (usually passive) to subject to financial or other trouble
3. (Textiles) to damage (esp furniture), as by scratching or denting it, in order to make it appear older than it is
4. (Furniture) to damage (esp furniture), as by scratching or denting it, in order to make it appear older than it is
5. (Law) law a less common word for distrain
6. archaic to compel
n
7. (Psychology) mental pain; anguish
8. (Psychology) the act of distressing or the state of being distressed
9. (Social Welfare) physical or financial trouble
10. (Navigation) in distress (of a ship, aircraft, etc) in dire need of help
11. (Law) law
a. the seizure and holding of property as security for payment of or in satisfaction of a debt, claim, etc; distraint
b. the property thus seized
c. US (as modifier): distress merchandise.
[C13: from Old French destresse distress, via Vulgar Latin, from Latin districtus divided in mind; see distrain]
disˈtressful adj
disˈtressfully adv
disˈtressfulness n
disˈtressing adj, n
disˈtressingly adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

dis•tress

(dɪˈstrɛs)

n.
1. acute anxiety, pain, or sorrow.
2. anything that causes anxiety, pain, or sorrow.
3. a state of extreme necessity, trouble, or misfortune.
4. the state of a ship or airplane requiring immediate assistance, as when on fire in transit.
5. the legal seizure and detention of another's goods as security for debt, etc.; a distraint.
v.t.
6. to afflict with pain, anxiety, or sorrow; trouble; worry.
7. to subject to pressure or strain: to be distressed by excessive work.
8. to compel by pain or force of circumstances.
9. to scratch or stain (furniture, wood, etc.) so as to give an appearance of age.
[1250–1300; Middle English destresse < Anglo-French distresse, destresse, Old French « Latin district(us) (see district)]
dis•tress′ing•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

distress


Past participle: distressed
Gerund: distressing

Imperative
distress
distress
Present
I distress
you distress
he/she/it distresses
we distress
you distress
they distress
Preterite
I distressed
you distressed
he/she/it distressed
we distressed
you distressed
they distressed
Present Continuous
I am distressing
you are distressing
he/she/it is distressing
we are distressing
you are distressing
they are distressing
Present Perfect
I have distressed
you have distressed
he/she/it has distressed
we have distressed
you have distressed
they have distressed
Past Continuous
I was distressing
you were distressing
he/she/it was distressing
we were distressing
you were distressing
they were distressing
Past Perfect
I had distressed
you had distressed
he/she/it had distressed
we had distressed
you had distressed
they had distressed
Future
I will distress
you will distress
he/she/it will distress
we will distress
you will distress
they will distress
Future Perfect
I will have distressed
you will have distressed
he/she/it will have distressed
we will have distressed
you will have distressed
they will have distressed
Future Continuous
I will be distressing
you will be distressing
he/she/it will be distressing
we will be distressing
you will be distressing
they will be distressing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been distressing
you have been distressing
he/she/it has been distressing
we have been distressing
you have been distressing
they have been distressing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been distressing
you will have been distressing
he/she/it will have been distressing
we will have been distressing
you will have been distressing
they will have been distressing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been distressing
you had been distressing
he/she/it had been distressing
we had been distressing
you had been distressing
they had been distressing
Conditional
I would distress
you would distress
he/she/it would distress
we would distress
you would distress
they would distress
Past Conditional
I would have distressed
you would have distressed
he/she/it would have distressed
we would have distressed
you would have distressed
they would have distressed
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.distress - psychological suffering; "the death of his wife caused him great distress"
painfulness, pain - emotional distress; a fundamental feeling that people try to avoid; "the pain of loneliness"
anguish, torture, torment - extreme mental distress
self-torment, self-torture - self-imposed distress
tsoris - (Yiddish) trouble and suffering
2.distress - a state of adversity (danger or affliction or need); "a ship in distress"; "she was the classic maiden in distress"
anguish - extreme distress of body or mind
adversity, hard knocks, hardship - a state of misfortune or affliction; "debt-ridden farmers struggling with adversity"; "a life of hardship"
pressure - an oppressive condition of physical or mental or social or economic distress
throe - hard or painful trouble or struggle; "a country in the throes of economic collapse"
3.distress - extreme physical pain; "the patient appeared to be in distress"
hurting, pain - a symptom of some physical hurt or disorder; "the patient developed severe pain and distension"
4.distress - the seizure and holding of property as security for payment of a debt or satisfaction of a claim; "Originally distress was a landlord's remedy against a tenant for unpaid rents or property damage but now the landlord is given a landlord's lien"
seizure - the taking possession of something by legal process
Verb1.distress - bring into difficulties or distress, especially financial hardship
discommode, disoblige, incommode, inconvenience, put out, trouble, bother - to cause inconvenience or discomfort to; "Sorry to trouble you, but..."
2.distress - cause mental pain to; "The news of her child's illness distressed the mother"
disturb, trouble, upset - move deeply; "This book upset me"; "A troubling thought"
besiege - cause to feel distressed or worried; "She was besieged by so many problems that she got discouraged"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

distress

noun
2. danger, risk, difficulty, peril, jeopardy, endangerment The ship might be in distress.
3. need, suffering, trouble, trial, difficulties, poverty, misery, hard times, hardship, straits, misfortune, adversity, calamity, affliction, privation, destitution, ill-fortune, ill-luck, indigence There was little support to help them in their distress.
verb
1. upset, worry, trouble, pain, wound, bother, disturb, dismay, grieve, torment, harass, afflict, harrow, agitate, sadden, perplex, disconcert, agonize, fluster, perturb, faze, throw (someone) off balance I did not want to frighten or distress her.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

distress

verb
1. To cause anxious uneasiness in:
2. To cause suffering or painful sorrow to:
noun
2. A state of physical or mental suffering:
3. The condition of being in need of immediate assistance:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
سَبب في الحُزْن، مَكْروبكَرَب، حُزْن، غَميُسَبِّب الأسف والحُزْن
bídabolesttrápenítrápitúzkost
bekymrebekymringnødsmertesorg
gyötrelem
kvöl, òjáning, neyîvalda sársauka eîa sorgvalda sorg
kankinamaisielvarto sukėlėjassukeliantis sielvartąsukelti sielvartą
bēdasciešanasciešanu cēlonispostssagādāt ciešanas
stiskažalost
acıacı vermekdertıstırapıstırap çektirmek

distress

[dɪsˈtres]
A. N
1. (= pain) → dolor m; (= mental anguish) → angustia f, aflicción f (Med) (after exertion) → agotamiento m, fatiga f
to be in great distressestar sufriendo mucho
2. (= danger) → peligro m
to be in distress [ship etc] → estar en peligro
3. (= poverty) → miseria f
to be in financial distresspasar apuros económicos
B. VT (physically) → doler; (mentally) → angustiar, afligir (Med) → agotar, fatigar
C. CPD distress rocket Ncohete m de señales
distress signal Nseñal f de socorro
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

distress

[dɪˈstrɛs]
n
(emotional)détresse f
in distress [person] → angoissé(e)
(= danger) in distress [ship] → en perdition; [plane] → en détresse distress call
(= pain) → souffrances fpl, souffrance f
in distress [animal] → en détresse
vt [+ person] → bouleverser
to be distressed by sth → être bouleversé(e) par qchdistress call nappel m de détresse
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

distress

n
Verzweiflung f; (physical) → Leiden nt; (mental, cause of distress) → Kummer m, → Sorge f; to be in great distresssehr leiden; to cause somebody distressjdm Sorge/starke Schmerzen bereiten
(= great poverty)Not f, → Elend nt
(= danger)Not f; to be in distress (ship)in Seenot sein; (plane)in Not sein; distress callNotsignal nt
vt (= worry)Kummer machen (+dat), → Sorge bereiten (+dat); don’t distress yourselfmachen Sie sich (dat)keine Sorgen!; the thought distressed him enormouslyder Gedanke bekümmerte ihn sehr

distress

:
distress rocket
nNotrakete f
distress signal
nNotsignal nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

distress

[dɪsˈtrɛs]
1. n
a. (mental anguish) → angoscia, pena; (pain) → dolore m
to be in great distress → essere sconvolto/a or affranto/a dal dolore
b. (poverty) → bisogno
c. (danger) → pericolo
in distress (Brit) (ship) → in difficoltà, in pericolo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

distress

(diˈstres) noun
1. great sorrow, trouble or pain. She was in great distress over his disappearance; Is your leg causing you any distress?; The loss of all their money left the family in acute distress.
2. a cause of sorrow. My inability to draw has always been a distress to me.
verb
to cause pain or sorrow to. I'm distressed by your lack of interest.
diˈstressing adjective
diˈstressingly adverb
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

dis·tress

n. angustia, apuro, preocupación, aflicción;
v.
to be in ___estar angustiado-a, estar afligido-a.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

distress

n distrés m, aflicción f; respiratory — distrés respiratorio
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
His demands and your inexperience together, on a small, very small income, must have brought on distresses which would not be the LESS grievous to you, from having been entirely unknown and unthought of before.
He would then have suffered under the pecuniary distresses which, because they are removed, he now reckons as nothing.
The distresses of various social-sexual experiences therefore were placed in the context of other nonsexual psychosocial stressors.