disulfiram


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di·sul·fi·ram

 (dī-sŭl′fə-răm′)
n.
A drug used in the treatment of alcoholism that interferes with the metabolic degradation of alcohol, producing an unpleasant reaction when even a small quantity of alcohol is consumed.

[disulfi(de) + (thiu)ram, one of its constituents (thi(o)- + ur(ea) + am(ide)).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

disulfiram

(ˌdaɪsʌlˈfɪərəm)
n
(Pharmacology) a drug used in the treatment of alcoholism that acts by inducing nausea and other unpleasant effects following ingestion of alcohol
[C20: from tetraethylthiuram disulfide]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.disulfiram - a drug (trade name Antabuse) used in the treatment of alcoholismdisulfiram - a drug (trade name Antabuse) used in the treatment of alcoholism; causes nausea and vomiting if alcohol is ingested
medicament, medication, medicinal drug, medicine - (medicine) something that treats or prevents or alleviates the symptoms of disease
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

disulfiram

n disulfiram m
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
A double blind, placebo-controlled trial that combines disulfiram and naltrexone for treating co-occurring cocaine and alcohol dependence.
There are similar stories of successful medication use in alcohol-dependent men, but the experiences of the four women profiled here were chosen because each used one or more of the approved medications for alcohol dependence treatment--acamprosate, disulfiram, oral naltrexone, and extended-release injectable naltrexone--and their experiences highlight different points about the various paths individuals take on their journeys to recovery.
Conventional naltrexone and disulfiram are dosed as once-daily tablets.
Other approved treatments, including the generic drugs naltrexone and disulfiram, have been on the market for a number of years.
But although they release a chemical called disulfiram which is designed to bring on violent side effects when mixed with alcohol, Best has since been seen on several occasions swigging back glasses of wine.
For several years, researchers and physicians have pondered the effectiveness of treating alcoholics with disulfiram (Antabuse), a drug that counteracts alcohol craving by causing such ill effects as nausea and flushing whenever a person takes an alcoholic drink.
* Disulfiram generally is not recommended for use in patients with clinically apparent hepatic insufficiency, such as decompensated cirrhosis or preexisting jaundice.
* Disulfiram Unlike naltrexone and acamprosate, which work by altering the brain's reward circuits, disulfiram blocks metabolism of ethanol, leading to the accumulation of a toxic metabolite and its punishing syndrome.
Mas alla de aquellos tratamientos que tienen la indicacion - naltrexona3, acamprosato (4) y disulfiram (5) - los resultados obtenidos por otras moleculas han sido erraticos.
In addition to depot naltrexone, the Food and Drug Administration has cleared oral naltrexone (generic), disulfiram (Antabuse, Odyssey Pharmaceuticals), and acamprosate (Campral, Forest Labs) for treatment of alcohol use disorders in the United States.
Additional information comes from observations of alcoholics who were treated with ALDH inhibitors (e.g., the medication disulfiram) to deter further alcohol consumption but who nevertheless drank alcohol and therefore also accumulated acetaldehyde.
Delegates voted that the AMA should support legislation and urge the Department of Health and Human Services to modify or eliminate the exclusion of various prescription drugs from coverage under Part D, and to ensure that Medicare contractors administering the new drug benefit include on their formularies medications to treat psychiatric and substance use disorders, including benzodiazepines, methadone, buprenorphine, acamprosate, disulfiram, and naltrexone.