disyllabic


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Related to disyllabic: polysyllabic

di·syl·la·ble

also dis·syl·la·ble  (dī′sĭl′ə-bəl, dī-sĭl′-, dĭ-)
n.
A word with two syllables.

di′syl·lab′ic (dī′sĭ-lăb′ĭk, dĭs′sĭ-) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.disyllabic - having or characterized by or consisting of two syllables
syllabic - consisting of a syllable or syllables
Translations

disyllabic

[ˌdɪsɪˈlæbɪk] ADJdisílabo

disyllabic

adj wordzweisilbig
References in periodicals archive ?
The speech reception threshold (SRT) was measured using Arabic disyllabic words (50% correct) with speech and the noise signal arriving from the front.
In addition, Hebrew words are typically disyllabic or monosyllabic, unless they consist of a suffix (e.g.
Only disyllabic pseudowords were used and sequence length varied from two to six items, with two trials for each level of difficulty following a memory span procedure (see Appendix 2 for the list of stimuli).
When the literature is examined, it is seen that with the education and lip reading, disyllabic word score and sentence score of LO patients reached to 100% and 93% respectively after ABI [9, 15].
Resolution can be understood as a way to render the rhythm of Old English verses less monotonous by breaking a monosyllabic lift into a disyllabic sequence: See the metrical section of J.R.R.
Jason also recognises and reads a range of disyllabic words by sight, for example, 'sandwich', 'yogurt' and 'orange'.
(5) For example, Old English vocabulary favors short mono- or disyllabic words, whereas the Iroquoian languages are polysynthetic, meaning that they use words composed of many different morphemes.
* Dichotic Digits Test: Dichotic Test which assesses the figure ground ability for verbal sounds: 80 disyllabic numbers consisting of 4 digits are presented: two in each ear simultaneously in which the patient repeats the four digits presented, thus, assessing the binaural integration.
Phonological instruction should begin with mono-syllabic words (words with one syllable), followed by disyllabic words (words with two syllables) and then with polysyllabic words (words with three or more syllables), which are more difficult to encode.
The last line illustrates the prosodic contrast between "without" and "sans" that may have made Shakespeare turn to the latter for economy, but the use of both at once--for the only time in the canon--with "sans" countering rather than fulfilling expectations, also contributes a note of urgency through the burst of the two monosyllables, "sans all," after the triple use of the disyllabic "without": the sequence begins in disarray but turns to artful rhetoric.
Other parameters include the frequency of syllabic suffixes -ed and -eth; the use of disyllabic variants of suffixes -ion and -ious; the frequency of pleonastic verb "do" and of grammatical inversions; the frequency of alliterations; and the use of deviations from the metre to emphasize the meaning of the situation described in the line (not unlike onomatopoeia), for example, "Duck with French nods and apish courtesy" instead of something more "iambic," like: "Or duck with apish nods."
Results: Recognition of disyllabic easy words, disyllabic hard words, monosyllabic easy words, and monosyllabic hard words increased with time after CI implantation.