dittay

dittay

(ˈdɪtteɪ)
n
the accusation or charge against a person in a criminal case
References in periodicals archive ?
The assize trying Marabel Cowper in Orkney in 1624, working through her dittay (indictment) point by point, produced the following findings: "Fyllis [that is, convicts] hir in the secund poynt of dittay conforme to the dittay sworne and that sho gave hir furth to have knawledge in that sho said sho sould lay hir lyff for him....
This, often described as "laying on and taking off sickness," could be included in the witch's dittay (indictment).
Dittays (indictments) of witches often included numerous individual charges of malefice, and sometimes would also include and describe acts of healing as acts of witchcraft.
Following them are the trial records, or dittays, for John Fian, whose scriptural references seemed to be influenced by the reformed religion; for Agnes Sampson, whose confessions echoed old religious magical practices and told of striving to delay the queen's homecoming; for Barbara Napier, who was arraigned for consulting with witches and who aided Bothwell against the king; and Euphame MacCalzean, who reportedly made love charms.