dittography


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dittography

(dɪˈtɒɡrəfɪ)
n, pl -phies
1. the unintentional repetition of letters or words
2. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) a passage of manuscript demonstrating dittography
dittographic adj
References in periodicals archive ?
note: the citation is to Aristotle's Politics, book 1, chapter 2, so this may be an instance of dittography. (j) nihil] [begin strikethrough][ ?
15: "Lowlandsas"; 270, quote: dash missing "Much of Australasian nomenclature is due to "the man in the bush"--more precise address not recorded"; 271: "a more specific denotata" > denotate/denotatum; 314f.: dittography of "overlap ...
Tov offers copious examples of common mistakes made in textual transmission (homoioteleuton, homoioarcton, haplography, dittography, etc.), many illustrated by citations from the Dead Sea Scrolls.
(45) Following reed, for example, I transcribe dittography, indicating relevant instances in notes; I also enclose cancelled text in square brackets ([]), mark illegible text by angle brackets enclosing a stop for each illegible letter (<...>), and indicate interlineations above the line by enclosing them in upper half brackets ([??]).
(88) The manuscript excerpt of the continuation even repeats an erroneous dittography in Caxton's edition ("distroyeng of of heretikes") and has an odd word division in the name of the feast day "whit sontyd" (Whitsuntide) where Caxton's edition has a mid-word line break ("whit | sontyd").
The alternative, of error through dittography (original Navar or Never being corrupted to Strenever by 'strenthis' before it), is possible, but causes metrical difficulties and is so less likely.
(37) An extra letter can occur by dittography. Each emendation is relatively minor, still for three such errors (requiring emendations) to occur in a short word is rather unlikely.
Could Lucretius not have written ibi, which dittography of the preceding s corrupted to sibi?
This examination is aimed, first, at fostering "marginal" opinions which the author believes to be fundamentally correct--and the rejection of which since times immemorial (by Schleiermacher and others) he considers to have greatly harmed and hampered our understanding of the Ephesian philosopher; second, at introducing some personal corrections and additions to these opinions; and third, at illustrating the advantages of a deliberately unprejudiced approach towards our sources, an approach based on the presumption of innocence, knowledgeability, and intelligence for all our informers and on the rejection of any rejection (this is not a dittography!) of any source on ground of mere suspicion.
Instead, dittography, divergence from normal formulas, and the desire to adjust letter spacing produced the majority of the recognizable corrections.
here (following the defence of, among others, Bernhard and Armini) retains F's et pater meus, which was deleted by Salmasius as a dittography with et frater meus.
The extreme case of parallels occurs in the occasional dittography. [118r.1.sup.4] [hie.sup.2] [utan.sup.2] [wre.sup.1][[thorn]edon..sup.3] [118r.2.sup./] [hie.sup.2] [utan.sup.2] [wre.sup.2][[thorn]e.sup.1][don.sup.2] [118r.14-16..sup.2] [7.sub.1] [ic.sup.1] [swi[eth]e.sup.3] [wundra.sup.1][de.sup.3] [[thorn]a.sup.0] [ge-.sup./]-[saelignesse.sup.4] [[thorn]aere.sup.2] [eor[eth]an.sup.1] [7.sup.0] [ic.sup.1] [swi[thorn]e.sup.3] [wund.sup./][rade.sup.4] [[thorn]a.sup.0] [ge-.sup.3]-[saelignesse.sup.4] [[thorn]aere.sup.2] [eor[eth]an.sup.1]