diversion

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di·ver·sion

 (dĭ-vûr′zhən, dī-)
n.
1. The act or an instance of diverting or turning aside; deviation.
2. Something that distracts the mind and relaxes or entertains.
3. A maneuver that draws the attention of an opponent away from a planned point of action, especially as part of military strategy.
4. A policy or practice permitting a juvenile to be removed from traditional processing in juvenile court and placed in a program involving an alternative disposition, such as treatment or rehabilitation services.

[Late Latin dīversiō, dīversiōn-, act of turning aside, from Latin dīversus, past participle of dīvertere, to divert; see divert.]

di·ver′sion·ar′y adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

diversion

(daɪˈvɜːʃən)
n
1. the act of diverting from a specified course
2. (Navigation) chiefly Brit an official detour used by traffic when a main route is closed
3. something that distracts from business, etc; amusement
4. (Military) military a feint attack designed to draw an enemy away from the main attack
diˈversional, diˈversionary adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

di•ver•sion

(dɪˈvɜr ʒən, -ʃən, daɪ-)

n.
1. the act of diverting or turning aside, as from a course or purpose.
2. a channel made to divert the flow of water from one course to another or to direct the flow of water draining from a piece of ground.
3. Brit. a detour on a highway or road.
4. distraction from business, care, etc.; recreation; a pastime.
5. a military feint intended to draw off attention from the point of main attack.
[1590–1600; < Medieval Latin dīversiō < Latin dīvert(ere) to divert]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

diversion

1. The act of drawing the attention and forces of an enemy from the point of the principal operation; an attack, alarm, or feint that diverts attention.
2. A change made in a prescribed route for operational or tactical reasons. A diversion order will not constitute a change of destination.
3. A rerouting of cargo or passengers to a new transshipment point or destination or on a different mode of transportation prior to arrival at ultimate destination.
4. In naval mine warfare, a route or channel bypassing a dangerous area. A diversion may connect one channel to another or it may branch from a channel and rejoin it on the other side of the danger. See also demonstration.
Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms. US Department of Defense 2005.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.diversion - an activity that diverts or amuses or stimulatesdiversion - an activity that diverts or amuses or stimulates; "scuba diving is provided as a diversion for tourists"; "for recreation he wrote poetry and solved crossword puzzles"; "drug abuse is often regarded as a form of recreation"
activity - any specific behavior; "they avoided all recreational activity"
antic, prank, put-on, joke, trick, caper - a ludicrous or grotesque act done for fun and amusement
bathing - immersing the body in water or sunshine
festivity, celebration - any joyous diversion
dancing, terpsichore, dance, saltation - taking a series of rhythmical steps (and movements) in time to music
entertainment, amusement - an activity that is diverting and that holds the attention
escapade, lark - any carefree episode
escapism, escape - an inclination to retreat from unpleasant realities through diversion or fantasy; "romantic novels were her escape from the stress of daily life"; "his alcohol problem was a form of escapism"
eurhythmics, eurhythmy, eurythmics, eurythmy - the interpretation in harmonious bodily movements of the rhythm of musical compositions; used to teach musical understanding
fun, merriment, playfulness - activities that are enjoyable or amusing; "I do it for the fun of it"; "he is fun to have around"
gambling, gaming, play - the act of playing for stakes in the hope of winning (including the payment of a price for a chance to win a prize); "his gambling cost him a fortune"; "there was heavy play at the blackjack table"
game - an amusement or pastime; "they played word games"; "he thought of his painting as a game that filled his empty time"; "his life was all fun and games"
jest, joke, jocularity - activity characterized by good humor
night life, nightlife - the activity of people seeking nighttime diversion (as at the theater, a nightclub, etc.); "a futile search for intelligent nightlife"; "in the summer the nightlife shifts to the dance clubs"
pastime, pursuit, interest - a diversion that occupies one's time and thoughts (usually pleasantly); "sailing is her favorite pastime"; "his main pastime is gambling"; "he counts reading among his interests"; "they criticized the boy for his limited pursuits"
child's play, play - activity by children that is guided more by imagination than by fixed rules; "Freud believed in the utility of play to a small child"
frolic, gambol, romp, caper, play - gay or light-hearted recreational activity for diversion or amusement; "it was all done in play"; "their frolic in the surf threatened to become ugly"
athletics, sport - an active diversion requiring physical exertion and competition
2.diversion - a turning aside (of your course or attention or concern); "a diversion from the main highway"; "a digression into irrelevant details"; "a deflection from his goal"
turning, turn - the act of changing or reversing the direction of the course; "he took a turn to the right"
red herring - any diversion intended to distract attention from the main issue
3.diversion - an attack calculated to draw enemy defense away from the point of the principal attack
diversionary landing - an amphibious diversionary attack
attack, onrush, onset, onslaught - (military) an offensive against an enemy (using weapons); "the attack began at dawn"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

diversion

noun
1. distraction, deviation, deflection, digression The whole argument is a diversion.
3. (Chiefly Brit.) detour, deviation, circuitous route, roundabout way, indirect course They turned back because of traffic diversions.
4. (Chiefly Brit.) deviation, change, departure, variation, straying, divergence, digression a diversion from his fantasy-themed movies
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

diversion

noun
1. A departing from what is prescribed:
2. Activity engaged in for relaxation and amusement:
3. Something, especially a performance or show, designed to entertain:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
اِنْحِرافتَحْويلتَسْلِيَهتَغيير إتِّجاه
objížďkazábavaodklonodvrácenírozptýlení
afledningsmanøvreomkørselunderholdningadspredelse
kiertotieharhautusharrastus
preusmjeravanje prometa
elterelésterelõút
beining í aîra áttleiîa athygli burt frá e-uskemmtun, afòreying
迂回路
전환
dėmesio nukreipimaseismo nukreipimas kitu keliu
atzarojumsizklaidenovēršananovirzīšanās
odvrátenie
omläggning
ทางเบี่ยง
đường vòng

diversion

[daɪˈvɜːʃən] N
1. (Brit) [of traffic] → desviación f, desvío m
"Diversion" (road sign) → Desvío
2. (= distraction) to create a diversion (gen) → distraer (Mil) → producir una diversión
3. (= pastime) → diversión f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

diversion

[daɪˈvɜːrʃən] n
(British) (= changed route) → déviation f
(= distraction) → diversion f
to create a diversion → faire diversion
(= redirection) [money] → détournement m; [ship, vehicle] → détournement m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

diversion

n
(of traffic, stream)Umleitung f
(= relaxation)Unterhaltung f; for diversionzur Unterhaltung or Zerstreuung; it’s a diversion from workes ist eine angenehme Abwechslung von der Arbeit
(Mil, fig: = sth that distracts attention) → Ablenkung f; to create a diversionablenken; as a diversionum abzulenken
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

diversion

[daɪˈvɜːʃn] n (Brit) (Aut) → deviazione f; (of river) → diversione; (distraction) → divertimento; (old) (pastime) → diversivo, distrazione f
to create a diversion → creare un'azione diversiva
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

diversion

(daiˈvəːʃən) , ((American) -ʒən) noun
1. an alteration to a traffic route. There's a diversion at the end of the road.
2. (an act of) diverting attention.
3. (an) amusement.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

diversion

اِنْحِراف objížďka afledningsmanøvre Umleitung παρεκτροπή desvío kiertotie déviation preusmjeravanje prometa deviazione 迂回路 전환 omleiding avledning zmiana kierunku jazdy desvio объезд omläggning ทางเบี่ยง mecburi yön đường vòng 转向
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
Collins Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

diversion

n derivación f; — program (US) programa alterno, programa que ofrece una alternativa a una práctica dañina (como uso de drogas, prostitución, etc.) generalmente ordenadado por el tribunal; drug — desvío or desviación f de drogas; urinary — derivación urinaria
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The availability of diversional activities may provide distractions.
'The government must implement programs to CICL such as the rehabilitation at Bahay Pag-asa Children's Village, and diversional programs to give our children a chance to change their views in life.
People will try to overcome the stress moreover by through healthy coping strategies, for example, diversional therapy, progressive muscle relaxation techniques, seeking peer support, or by adverse coping strategies, for example, smoking, drinking alcohol, overeating or under eating, sleeping too much, etc.
Examples of restraint alternatives include covering tubes and lines, assessing pain or other needs, offering diversional activities, and increasing physical activity.
Number of Percentage of respondents (n) respondents (%) Occupational therapist 35 30.7 Physiotherapist 29 25.4 Nurse 13 11.4 Podiatrist 10 8.8 Psychologist 9 7.9 Dietician 7 6.1 Social worker 4 3.5 Diversional therapist 1 0.9 Other * 6 5.3 * 4 speech pathologists, 1 genetic counsellor, and 1 pharmacist.
These results were in concordance with previous research among nurses that found several alternative methods that could be used before applying Physical Restraints such as providing companionship and supervision, offering physical and diversional activities, playing soft music, manipulating environments.
Intervention focused on the process of creating art for the curative experiential component and diversional aspects, as well as the potential for generating vocational opportunities by crafting a useful or desired product (Fisher, 1998; Levine, 1987; Reed, 1986; Trombly, 1995; Yerxa, 1967).
"We have a diversional therapist in the morning, but in the afternoons and evenings patients can get bored.
They also offers hand massage and diversional activities.
This case study uses material objects to tell a story of Audrey Newton's experiences as a diversional therapist and occupational therapist from 1946-1952.
O caso televisivo, no entanto, foi uma ocorrencia (um discurso) que se inseria num contexto diversional. A comocao produzida pela aparicao ao vivo de uma moca com boa parte dos seios desnudos e de oculos escuros (imagem que remetia a ideia de pecado) gerou a ira dos censores e do arcebispo de Porto Alegre.
As a student placement in Diversional Therapy in residential aged care, this concerns me greatly.