dividing


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Related to dividing: long division

di·vide

 (dĭ-vīd′)
v. di·vid·ed, di·vid·ing, di·vides
v.tr.
1.
a. To separate into parts, sections, groups, or branches: divided the students into four groups. See Synonyms at separate.
b. To form a border or barrier between: A mountain chain divides France and Spain.
c. To sector into units of measurement; graduate: The ruler was divided into metric units.
d. To group according to kind; classify or assign: divided the plants into different species.
2.
a. To cause to separate into opposing factions; disunite: "They want not to divide either the Revolution or the Church but to be an integral part of both" (Conor Cruise O'Brien).
b. To cause (members of a parliament) to vote by separating into groups, as pro and con.
3. To give out or apportion among a number: Volunteers divided the different jobs among themselves. See Synonyms at distribute.
4. Mathematics
a. To subject (a number) to the process of division: divided 20 by 4.
b. To be a divisor of: 3 divides 9.
c. To use (a number) as a divisor: divided 5 into 35.
v.intr.
1.
a. To become separated into parts: The mixture will divide into several layers if left unagitated.
b. To branch out, as a river or a blood vessel.
c. To form into factions; take sides: The party divided evenly on the tax issue.
d. To vote by dividing.
2. Mathematics To perform the operation of division.
3. Biology To undergo cell division.
n.
1. A dividing point or line: "would clearly tip the court ... across a dangerous constitutional divide" (Lawrence H. Tribe).
2. See watershed.
Idiom:
divide and conquer
1. To exploit one's opponents' internal rivalries or divisions so as to prevent them from unifying against oneself, so that they may be defeated one by one.
2. To divide one's own forces or personnel so as to deal with different tasks simultaneously.

[Middle English dividen, from Latin dīvidere : dī-, dis-, dis- + -videre, to separate.]

di·vid′a·ble adj.

dividing

(dɪˈvaɪdɪŋ)
adj
serving to divide
Translations

dividing

[dɪˈvaɪdɪŋ]
A. ADJ [wall, fence] → divisorio
B. CPD dividing line Nlínea f divisoria

dividing

adj(ab)trennend

dividing

[dɪˈvaɪdɪŋ] adj (fence, wall, line) → divisorio/a
References in classic literature ?
The cruelty, the impolitic cruelty,"--he replied, with great feeling,--"of dividing, or attempting to divide, two young people long attached to each other, is terrible.
FOR the two following days, the travellers pursued a westerly course for thirty-four miles along a ridge of country dividing the tributary waters of the Missouri and the Yellowstone.
Rising from the midst of vast plains and prairies, traversing several degrees of latitude, dividing the waters of the Atlantic and the Pacific, and seeming to bind with diverging ridges the level regions on its flanks, it has been figuratively termed the backbone of the northern continent.
But this would be most evident, if any one could see such a government really established: for it would be impossible to frame such a city without dividing and separating it into its distinct parts, as public tables, wards, and tribes; so that here the laws will do nothing more than forbid the military to engage in agriculture, which is what the Lacedaemonians are at present endeavouring to do.
Contract notice: ukb - neubau reha - sanitary dividing walls
Dividing plants involves digging them up, splitting them into pieces which each have roots and growth shoots or buds, and then replanting them.
Dividing plants involves digging hem up, splitting them into pieces which each have roots and growth shoots or buds, and then replanting hem.
1 : the act of giving out or delivering to or dividing among <the weekly distribution to the poor>
IF you want to increase your stock next year, take a notebook and pen around the garden now and jot down what plants need lifting and dividing.
Genetic tests showed that the dividing cells had switched off a gene known asp27, but the gene remained on in the nondividers.
Slave hiring destabilized the system of slavery by dividing mastery; it not only challenged the presumed racial solidarity of whites, but also the absolute mastery needed to keep the enslaved under complete subjection to a master.