divining


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Related to divining: divining rod, methought

di·vine

 (dĭ-vīn′)
adj. di·vin·er, di·vin·est
1.
a. Having the nature of or being a deity.
b. Of, relating to, emanating from, or being the expression of a deity: sought divine guidance through meditation.
c. Being in the service or worship of a deity; sacred.
2. Superhuman; godlike.
3.
a. Supremely good or beautiful; magnificent: a divine performance of the concerto.
b. Extremely pleasant; delightful: had a divine time at the ball.
n.
1. A cleric.
2. A theologian.
v. di·vined, di·vin·ing, di·vines
v.tr.
1. To foretell, especially by divination. See Synonyms at foretell.
2. To guess or know by inspiration or intuition: somehow divined the answer despite not having read the assignment.
3. To locate (underground water or minerals) with a divining rod; douse.
v.intr.
1. To practice divination.
2. To guess.

[Middle English, from Old French devine, from Latin dīvīnus, divine, foreseeing, from dīvus, god; see dyeu- in Indo-European roots. V., Middle English divinen, from Old French deviner, from Latin dīvīnāre, from dīvīnus.]

di·vine′ly adv.
di·vine′ness n.
di·vin′er n.
Translations
hledání pomocí proutku
søgning
varázsvesszõs forráskutatás
vísa á vatn eîa málma meî spákvisti
hľadanie pomocou prútika
yer altında maden ve su bulma

divine

(diˈvain) adjective
1. of or belonging to God or a god. divine wisdom.
2. very good or excellent. What divine weather!
verb
to find out by keen understanding. I managed to divine the truth.
ˌdiviˈnation (divi-) noun
diˈviner noun
a person who has or claims a special ability to find hidden water or metals.
diˈvining noun
discovering the presence of underground water, metal etc by holding a diˈvining-rod which moves when held directly above the water etc. water-divining.
diˈvinity (-ˈvi-) plural diˈvinities noun
1. religious studies.
2. a god or goddess. The ancient Greeks worshipped many divinities.
3. the state of being divine. the divinity of God.
References in classic literature ?
Cide Hamete, the chronicler of this great history, begins this chapter with these words, "I swear as a Catholic Christian;" with regard to which his translator says that Cide Hamete's swearing as a Catholic Christian, he being- as no doubt he was- a Moor, only meant that, just as a Catholic Christian taking an oath swears, or ought to swear, what is true, and tell the truth in what he avers, so he was telling the truth, as much as if he swore as a Catholic Christian, in all he chose to write about Quixote, especially in declaring who Master Pedro was and what was the divining ape that astonished all the villages with his divinations.
In divining and keeping silence shall the friend be a master: not everything must thou wish to see.
Divining The Body: Reclaim The Holiness Of Your Physical Self by award-winning author Jan Phillips is a spiritual self-help guide especially for women.