divisive


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di·vi·sive

 (dĭ-vī′sĭv, -vĭs′-ĭv)
adj.
Creating dissension or discord.

di·vi′sive·ly adv.
di·vi′sive·ness n.
Usage Note: The word divisive is usually pronounced in both American and British English as (dĭ-vī′sĭv), with the stressed syllable having a long i. This was the preferred pronunciation of 88 percent of the Usage Panel in our 2013 ballot. The pronunciation with a short i in the stressed syllable, rhyming with permissive, was acceptable to only 16 percent of the Panel in 2001 but has made inroads since then, to the point where it was deemed acceptable by 65 percent of the Panel in 2013. The long-i pronunciation conforms to the regular rules for pronouncing English spelling, which call for a long vowel before a consonant-vowel sequence (as in decisive, derisive, and incisive) and a short vowel before a doubled consonant (as in missive and permissive). Though still less favored than the pronunciation with a long i, the pronunciation with a short i is on the path to becoming an established variant pronunciation in American English.

divisive

(dɪˈvaɪsɪv)
adj
1. causing or tending to cause disagreement or dissension
2. archaic having the quality of distinguishing
diˈvisively adv
diˈvisiveness n

di•vi•sive

(dɪˈvaɪ sɪv)

adj.
1. forming or expressing division or distribution.
2. creating dissension or discord.
[1590–1600; < Late Latin]
di•vi′sive•ly, adv.
di•vi′sive•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.divisive - dissenting (especially dissenting with the majority opinion)
discordant - not in agreement or harmony; "views discordant with present-day ideas"

divisive

adjective disruptive, unsettling, alienating, troublesome, controversial, contentious Abortion has always been a divisive issue.
Translations

divisive

[dɪˈvaɪsɪv] ADJdivisivo, causante de divisiones

divisive

[dɪˈvaɪsɪv] adj [issue] → qui divise l'opinion, qui crée des dissensions
to be divisive → diviser l'opinion

divisive

adj issue, figurekontrovers, umstritten; influence, effectpolarisierend; to be divisiveUneinigkeit schaffen; a divisive general electioneine Wahl, die das Land in zwei Lager spaltet

divisive

[dɪˈvaɪsɪv] adjche causa discordia
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He explained that in one of its meetings with the company held on June 2, 2017 the commission expressed its disappointment with the way and manner hate speech, divisive and inciting comments are applied in discussion of national issues in breach of the provisions of the NBC Act and Broadcast Code.
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