divorcement


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di·vorce·ment

 (dĭ-vôrs′mənt)
n.
Complete separation.

divorcement

(dɪˈvɔːsmənt)
n
(Law) a less common word for divorce

di•vorce•ment

(dɪˈvɔrs mənt, -ˈvoʊrs-)

n.
divorce; separation.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.divorcement - the legal dissolution of a marriagedivorcement - the legal dissolution of a marriage
separation - the social act of separating or parting company; "the separation of church and state"
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"

divorcement

noun
The act or an instance of separating one thing from another:
References in periodicals archive ?
"Divorcement" took place in the decade that followed, with major consequences to screenwriters and printing offices in Hollywood studios.
For example, a state's claim that prohibiting oil companies to own gasoline retailers (a "divorcement" law) is necessary to securing retail competition, and, hence, lower prices to consumers, might be answered by the FTC's economic expertise on vertical integration in the oil industry.
Vita (2000) shows that states with divorcement laws, which restrict vertical integration, have higher average prices.
In sound films, his good looks and superb voice made him a popular leading man in such major productions as "Grand Hotel" (1932, opposite Greta Garbo), "A Bill of Divorcement" (1932, Katharine Hepburn's screen debut), "Dinner at Eight" (1933, with brother Lionel), and "Twentieth Century" (1934, a watershed screwball comedy costarring Carole Lombard).
Fontaine's is not the only star persona to deploy the nymph symbolic: it is a noteworthy aspect of Katharine Hepburn's screen image (note the foliage that festoons the decor when she first spies her father in A Bill of Divorcement) as well as Audrey Hepburn who stars in the film version of a primary nymph narrative, Sabrina Fair, in 1954.
When a man takes a wife, and marries her, then it comes to pass, if she finds no favor in his eyes, because he has found some unseemly thing in her, that he writes her a bill of divorce, and gives it in her hand, and sends her out of his house, and she departs out of his house, and goes and becomes another man's wife, and the latter husband hates her, and writes her a bill of divorcement, and gives it in her hand, and sends her out of his house; or if the latter husband die, who took her to be his wife; her former husband, who sent her away, may not take her again to be his wife.
a Bill of Divorcement in accordance with the Jewish faith and with the law of the State of Israel."); Williamson, supra note 63, at 141 (citing In the Marriage of Gwiazda, 14-15 (Feb.
He finds that so-called "divorcement" regulations that restrict vertical integration lead to higher retail gasoline prices--an average increase of 2.6 cents per gallon.
The divorcement between American industry and American arts now appears a foregone conclusion.
once and for all, marked the divorcement of church and state." (10) Reminiscent of Francis Wayland, Truett declared that "Never, anywhere, in any clime, has a true Baptist been willing, for one minute, for the union of church and state, never for a moment." Like Helwys and Mullins, Truett extended religious freedom to all: "Although the Baptist is the very antithesis of his Catholic neighbor in religious conceptions and contentions ...