dizzying


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diz·zy

 (dĭz′ē)
adj. diz·zi·er, diz·zi·est
1. Having a whirling sensation and a tendency to fall.
2.
a. Bewildered or confused: "I was dizzy with anger and shame" (Amy Benson).
b. Slang Scatterbrained or silly.
3. Producing or tending to produce giddiness: a dizzy height.
4. Characterized by impulsive haste; very rapid: "There he sat ... gabbing at his usual dizzy pace" (H.L. Mencken).
tr.v. diz·zied, diz·zy·ing, diz·zies
1. To cause to have a whirling sensation.
2. To confuse or bewilder.

[Middle English dusie, disi, from Old English dysig, foolish.]

diz′zi·ly adv.
diz′zi·ness n.
diz′zy·ing·ly adv.

dizzying

(ˈdɪzɪɪŋ)
adj
causing dizziness, esp because of being excessive
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

dizzying

adjective
Producing dizziness or vertigo:
Translations

dizzying

[ˈdɪziɪŋ] adj [speed] → vertigineux/euse, étourdissant(e); [heights, number] → vertigineux/euse
References in periodicals archive ?
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