do-gooding


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do-good·ing

(do͞o′go͝od′ĭng)
n.
The act or action of doing good, especially naively in humanitarian causes.

do′-good′ing adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
If this contagion was limited to mobs of loony do-gooding, virtue signallers on the streets, society could cope, however, it has infected the entire social and cultural entity of this country.
about safety & do-gooding & a universe that writes
'DO-GOODING' is, interestingly, a synonym for activism, which, according to the Cambridge Dictionary's definition, is 'the use of direct and noticeable action to achieve a result, usually a political or social one'.
Over the last 60 years, the Ramon Magsaysay Award Foundation has scoured the remotest corners of Asia in search of individuals who embody a human quality that it calls-for want of a precise word-'greatness of spirit.' This is not to be equated with mere do-gooding, or with forms of work aimed at making the world a better place.
Nicole's morals keep getting her in trouble; major plot points revolve around her trying to clear the names of the innocent, and this do-gooding drives the plot.
This report has lifted the lid on international charities who for too long have focused on and peddled on their image of do-gooding in the world without wanting to address the dark underbelly that exists within.
There are loud whispers too of developing cracks in the judiciary led by a do-gooding chief justice whose noble intentions have become snarled in a web of controversial statements and gestures.
Erdogan finds it difficult to deal with do-gooding European leaders.
And once again, 'do-gooding' outsiders are assuming they know more about the candidates constituencies should choose than do the people in their own areas.
With its badges for do-gooding and stamp-collecting, and the way it called Sellotape "sticky-backed plastic", it seemed aimed purely at swots who wanted to wear shorts until they became prefects.
Yes, with Sport Relief this Friday it's time once again for BBC1's do-gooding token gesture Famous, Rich and Homeless, with the B&B resident snooker player, Nick Hancock, Julia Bradbury and bog scrubber Kim Woodburn.
On land is Chris Pine's Bernie Webber, a timid, do-gooding Guardsman stationed in Chatham.