dodgy

(redirected from dodgier)
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Related to dodgier: high handed

dodg·y

 (dŏj′ē)
adj. dodg·i·er, dodg·i·est Chiefly British
1. Evasive; shifty.
2. Unsound, unstable, and unreliable.
3. So risky as to require very deft handling.

dodgy

(ˈdɒdʒɪ)
adj, dodgier or dodgiest
1. risky, difficult, or dangerous
2. uncertain or unreliable; tricky

dodg•y

(ˈdɒdʒ i)

adj. dodg•i•er, dodg•i•est. Chiefly Brit.
1. evasive or tricky.
2. risky; hazardous; chancy.
[1860–65]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.dodgy - of uncertain outcome; especially fraught with risk; "an extremely dicey future on a brave new world of liquid nitrogen, tar, and smog"- New Yorker
dangerous, unsafe - involving or causing danger or risk; liable to hurt or harm; "a dangerous criminal"; "a dangerous bridge"; "unemployment reached dangerous proportions"
2.dodgy - marked by skill in deception; "cunning men often pass for wise"; "deep political machinations"; "a foxy scheme"; "a slick evasive answer"; "sly as a fox"; "tricky Dick"; "a wily old attorney"
artful - marked by skill in achieving a desired end especially with cunning or craft; "the artful dodger"; "an artful choice of metaphors"

dodgy

adjective
1. (Brit., Austral., & N.Z) nasty, offensive, unpleasant, revolting, distasteful, repellent, unsavoury, obnoxious, repulsive, objectionable, repugnant He was a bit of a dodgy character.
2. (Brit., Austral., & N.Z) risky, difficult, tricky, dangerous, delicate, uncertain, problematic(al), unreliable, dicky (Brit. informal), dicey (informal, chiefly Brit.), ticklish, chancy (informal) Predicting voting trends is a dodgy business.
3. second rate, poor, inferior, mediocre, shoddy, low-grade, low-quality, substandard, for the birds (informal), pants (slang), end-of-the-pier (Brit. informal), rubbishy, piss-poor (slang), bush-league (Austral. & N.Z. informal), half-pie (N.Z. informal) cheap hotels and dodgy food
Translations
خَطِر، فيه مُجازَفَهغَيْر آمِن، غَيْر موثوق
obtížnýriskantní
risikabelsværusikker
rizikós
áhættusamur; vafasamurvafasamur

dodgy

[ˈdɒdʒɪ] ADJ (Brit) (dodgier (compar) (dodgiest (superl)))
1. (= dishonest) [person] → de poco fiar, poco fiable; [business, deal, district] → oscuro, chungo (Sp) ; [practice] → dudoso
there's something dodgy about himhay algo en él que me da mala espina
the whole business seemed a bit dodgytodo el asunto parecía un poco oscuro
2. (= unreliable, uncertain) [plan] → arriesgado; [weather] → inestable
the clutch is a bit dodgyel embrague no anda muy bien, el embrague está un poco chungo (Sp)
he's in a dodgy situation financiallysu situación económica es un poco peliaguda
the sausages looked dodgylas salchichas tenían una pinta sospechosa
to have a dodgy backtener la espalda fastidiada, estar fastidiado de la espalda
to have a dodgy heartestar fastidiado del corazón

dodgy

[ˈdɒdʒi] adj
(= uncertain) → douteux/euse
(= shady) [character] → louche; [deal] → louche
(= unsafe) → peu sûr(e)

dodgy

adj (Brit inf)
(= dubious, uncertain) personzweifelhaft, zwielichtig; deal, business, practiceszwielichtig; area, loanzweifelhaft; planunsicher; situationvertrackt (inf), → verzwickt (inf); weatherunbeständig; there’s something dodgy about himer ist nicht ganz koscher (inf); there’s something dodgy about this businessdie Sache ist nicht ganz astrein (inf); it’s a dodgy business (= uncertain)es ist eine unsichere Sache; he’s on dodgy grounder befindet sich auf unsicherem Boden
(= weak) back, heartschwach; (= damaged) tyre, car/boat etc partdefekt; he has a dodgy stomach from eating oysterser hat Austern gegessen und sich damit den Magen verdorben
(= near-the-knuckle) remarkanstößig

dodgy

[ˈdɒdʒɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) (fam) (plan) → azzardato/a, rischioso/a; (deal) → sospetto/a, poco chiaro/a; (person) → losco/a
we're in a dodgy situation → navighiamo in cattive acque

dodge

(dodʒ) verb
to avoid (something) by a sudden and/or clever movement. She dodged the blow; He dodged round the corner out of sight; Politicians are very good at dodging difficult questions.
noun
1. an act of dodging.
2. a trick. You'll never catch him – he knows every dodge there is.
ˈdodgy adjective
1. difficult or risky. Catching the 5.15 train after the meeting will be rather dodgy.
2. (of a person, organization etc) not trustworthy or safe, financially or otherwise. I think the whole business sounds a bit dodgy.
References in periodicals archive ?
IF YOU still think pole dancing is all about dodgy clubs - and even dodgier clientele - then you've got some catching up to do.
There was another reason so many of us were willing to overlook his dodgier statements, one that's been forgotten over the last few years as he gradually seems to have lost the plot: he was really rather good at running London.
Our defence looked even dodgier last time out against Slovakia.
You could wake up the morning after the night before in a much more dodgier financial position.
FOR all the talk of great stadia, dodgy pitches and even dodgier policing, nearly all of us will have been watching the European Championships from the comfort of our own homes.
Immediately bringing closure to them is dodgier, since some coy stellar tandems never affirmed that they were on to begin with-so, they can't be expected to admit that they are now officially off
AN angry tenant is fuming over a dangerous boiler and an even dodgier landlord.
The PM was uninspiring and dishonest, mixing deceitful statistics with dodgier arguments.
So, with dodgy dress sense and the even dodgier Locke-a-| GBBO Paul in the Ali G-like patois, he's decided to go from Thug Life to The Good Life and buy himself and his girlfriend Jackie a little smallholding somewhere unpronouncable.
Locke-|GBBO Paul in the So, with dodgy dress sense and the even dodgier Ali G-like patois, he's decided to go from Thug Life to The Good Life and buy himself and his girlfriend Jackie a little small holding somewhere unpronouncable.
Carol Meehan would certainly have met her match in Kat - the former Slater girl would have her pick of dodgy men in even dodgier leather cwa coats to choose from when it comes to affairs.
As this instalment celebrates the arrival of the VCR, the home computer, the microwave and leg-warmers, there are plenty of TV howlers too, highlighting the dodgier editorial decisions of the decade, notably, Erica Roe demonstrating the benefits of a new invention called the sports bra in endless, slow motion close-up.